Archive for the ‘Depression Articles’ Category

The morning started out like every other morning, nothing different… the same ole blues, moaning about being tired and oh me another day. Quickly, well for me it was quickly, I put on my clothes and headed up stairs for the only good thing about a day, coffee. I filled my cup, sat in my chair and did what I do every day, glared out the window at another ugly day.

The above paragraph used to be my life but something changed. Depression had me wrapped up in a dark world of nothingness for many years. Today I am free. Today, and just for this day I don’t live in the dark world of depression. For years the, good ole doctors experiment with different drugs, different treatments, hospitalization after hospitalization but nothing seem to provide a lasting cure for my deep feelings of sadness and hatred of life.

I remember thinking God didn’t love me or even have time to listen to me. I did believe He existed but I believed He didn’t have much to do with those exiled to earth. I tried God on many occasion but that didn’t seem to help. What was I to do? I hate life and I had tried suicide more than once and that didn’t even work so what was I to do.

The solution wasn’t more medication or adding a different pills to the existing pills I was taking. Neither was it more group therapy, or reading positive affirmations every morning… though all this helped it wasn’t the answer.

Today, I started my morning the same way. I started my morning in the days of my deepest depression. I quickly put on my clothes moaned, yes I still moan about being tired. I headed up stairs for my cup of coffee, sat down in the same chair and stared out the same window but this time I saw the green leaves on the beautiful trees. Wow, what a difference; for three years, for the most part, I have been depression free. Now, that doesn’t mean I don’t have my moments where the blues creep in but it is so different. I am free from all the medicine I used to take and I even exercise a bit. I work all day long and I am happy, for the most part.

Depression free is simply but it takes work. If it wasn’t simply I wouldn’t be free. If it didn’t take work on my part I would not be free. For me the combination of faith and work has been the simple solution.

I am going to list a few things I do on a daily basis that worked for me today. First, I pray when I sit down in my chair. I have developed a real faith in God’s power to set me free. I also make the decision to see the green in the trees and focus only on the good not the bad. I don’t devaluate anything, especially myself. I am a nice person and a good person. Depression in most cases, at least for me, came from three unhealthy thoughts or ideas. One, I was a bad person. Oh no, I am a good person. I might do a few bad things now and then but my heart has been changed by the power of a living God. Next, I don’t look at the future in a negative light. Depression says, “The future is hopeless.” No it isn’t. God has my future in His hands and I trust Him to do the right thing. Another thing or thought I had to change was about this day. I used to tell myself that today was horrible and it would never change. Wrong, this is a great day and I will live it to the fullest.

In reviewing my part in living a relatively depression free life I have to include a little exercise, no alcohol and the willingness to keep getting up in the morning and changing my thoughts. I also would include putting on my clothes, sitting in my chair, drinking my coffee, and looking out the window with the hope of; the hope…let me repeat that word, the hope of living one more day depression free. In addition, I must conclude that I owe my freedom to direct intervention from God. I know that sounds too simply but it is working and I pray it continues to work. I don’t care to live in the dark world and I don’t have to.

If you are suffering from depression, I hope you find the way out. You must never give up and believe me, suicide is never the answer. If you feel like you want to hurt yourself or anyone else, dial 911 and ask for help or call your doctor. I had to do that many times and it kept me from doing what I really didn’t want to do, die depressed.

Dr Bob Wilkerson is author of the book, “I Will Not Be Defeated Anymore”. He is dedicated to helping others recover from life altering circumstances. Dr. Bob is a motivational speaker/singer with a true life story of God’s power to change any individuals life. If you would like more information go to http://www.freewebs.com/bobwilkerson

Is dog depression real? You bet it is! You may at some point note that your dog is not behaving normally and he may in fact be offering you what seem like classic symptoms of depression.

Depression, strangely enough, is not so different in humans than it is in animals. It is possible that your pet may be a victim of canine depression. It’s possible of course that your pet may be suffering from something else. The condition may in fact be medical or physical. As a result, it is prudent to check with your veterinarian to assure that there is no problem with the way that your pet is feeling.

When you first notice your dog behaving as though he or she is depressed, really consider what has happened that may have impacted their moods. Pets, just like humans, can have temporary or short term depression – or they may also have a longer term depression.

The loss of a litter, the family moving, or even the being moved to a different home can have a vast impact on an animal. One family who moved said that their cocker spaniel was not herself for many months afterward, exhibiting all the classic signs of depression.

If nothing has happened that may have impacted your dog in a negative way, then perhaps a veterinary checkup is in order.

Dogs, like people, remarkably can have bad days and good days. They can be in bad moods or good moods. One day they may appear to be unusually moody and the next day is very happy and upbeat. In addition, female dogs that have not been spayed can exhibit mood swings during their heat cycle.

Canine depression can last for an extended period, just like human depression.

Some symptoms that you may see of canine depression will also be similar to human ones.
The signs that you will most likely note:

Poor appetite
Weight Loss
Lower interest in play
Slow or lethargic movements
Apathy
Aggression
Restlessness
Excessive Shedding

The environment around your dog can make a great deal of difference to his or her mood. Just as environmental or personal changes will impact you, they will also impact your dog.

Having a close human relationship change can trigger canine depression. For instance, if their human companion gets ill, dies, moves out, or goes back to school it can cause loneliness in your pet and lead to dog depression.
Believe it or not, pets can also suffer from a chemical depression that is from an imbalance in their bodies. Your dog can be diagnosed as clinically depressed and may be given an antidepressant medication by your vet.

Try to recall the events that preceded the depression and attempt to compensate for them. Try to give the dog more attention and make them feel less alone or lonely during the daytime. Bring in a neighbor dog that the animal gets along with and take them out for the evening together.

As with humans, depression is very treatable once properly diagnosed and treated. The result? A happy member of your family!

Dana Zarcone is a National Certified Counselor. She created www.depression-test.net to provide information, tools and support to those suffering with depression. Learn more about dog depression by going to her website.

With more menopausal women seeking natural therapies to ease symptoms, a new study has found that simply adding a brisk walking routine can reduce a variety of psychological symptoms such as anxiety, stress and depression. The research is published in the January issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

“With the aging population, physical activity represents one way for women to stay mentally healthy. Physical activity can help throughout the menopausal transition and afterwards,” said Temple University public health researcher Deborah Nelson, Ph.D, the study’s lead author.

From 1996 to 1997, 380 women living in Philadelphia were recruited and they have been followed for more than eight years. The women reported their physical activity level and menopausal symptoms including stress, anxiety, depression and hot flashes.

The average age at the beginning of the study was 42 –years –old; 49 percent were African American, 58 percent reported more than a high school education, and 38 percent smoked cigarettes.

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“We recruited African-American and Caucasian women living in Philadelphia for this study to better represent the large population of urban women. These results can be generalizable to both urban Caucasian and African-American women, groups of women that have been under-represented in previous studies,” Nelson said.

In the category of stress, researchers found that high levels of physical activity were the most beneficial to postmenopausal women and African-American women. They reported lower levels of perceived stress than those who did not exercise. This top-tier group walked at a moderate pace (4 miles per hour) for an hour and a half at least five times a week.

While the study found mental benefits of exercise, it did not show that exercise reduced physical symptoms such as hot flashes.

“Physical symptoms like hot flashes will go away when you reach menopause, but mental health is something women still need to think about post-menopause,” Nelson said.

The middle tier walked five times a week for 40 minutes. The bottom group — considered the non-exercisers — walked for 15 minutes about five times a week.

By design, all of the women were pre-menopausal at baseline. Eight years after enrollment, 20 percent of the women were menopausal with an additional 18 percent classified in the late transitional phase.

“In the urban setting, these women walked outside on city blocks or in shopping malls. Groups could organize to take walks after dinner. It didn’t require going to the gym,” Nelson said. “You don’t have to run 20 miles a week to reap the benefits of exercise. If you stick to a moderate-paced walking schedule, it can keep your body mass index down and lower the risk of stress, anxiety and depression,” she added.

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Depression Treatment Scottsdale. Dr. Gronley is a Scottsdale psychiatrist and has posted several articles on depression, anxiety, OCD, ADHD, bipolar disorder, and other articles of interest. To read the entire article on situational vs clinical depression go to http://psychiatristscottsdale.com/types-of-depression/
http://scottsdalepsychiatrist.com
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http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/03/01/side-effects-antidepressants.aspx?x_cid=youtube Natural health expert and Mercola.com founder Dr. Joseph Mercola interviews Dr. Hyla Cass about the dangers of antidepressants, as well as nutritional and alternative treatment for depression.
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