Archive for the ‘Grammar Articles’ Category

Proper grammar and punctuation is a very important part of writing and publishing content whether in the form of books, articles, guides, flyers and essays. Without document proofreading it’s almost impossible to have a completely error free piece of content so it’s important to make sure that you go through the document for proper grammar and punctuation and you have someone else do the same once you are finished. Using a few tips, tricks and techniques can help to make the process go smoothly and quickly.

Commas and Capitalization

These are two areas of proper grammar and punctuation that are easily overlooked by common spell checkers used after a document is complete. This is why document proofreading with the human eye is so crucial. Using commas in the wrong place or not using them when they’re needed can change the entire presentation of the content you are proofreading. It’s best to read through a document slowly and accurately to make sure that commas and capitals are used in their proper places. It’s also a good idea to read over a document more than one time when proofreading it.

Use of the Correct Words

Another huge aspect of proper grammar and punctuation is being able to spot words that were not used in the correct context. For example, the word whole could be spelled as hole but that would make the entire sentence mean something totally different. This is something that is usually overlooked by spelling and grammar checkers, which makes document proofreading all that much more necessary. Sometimes there are numerous spelling and meanings of a particular word so paying close attention to this is essential in maintaining the integrity of written copy.

Tips on Document Proofreading

To make sure proper grammar and punctuation are displayed throughout your content, there are a few ways to make the process more effective. First of all, reading each sentence backward at least one time will provide you with an entirely new aspect of how things are presented within the document. You might be surprised as to how many spelling errors and grammar problems you pick up by doing this. Although some argue that it takes too much time to read the sentences backwards since it isn’t natural, the time saved in later fixing errors that were missed is well worth it.

Keeping a dictionary and a grammar resource guide handy can also help to catch all errors as you proofread. You should also consider having someone else proofread your content for proper grammar and punctuation as well. They can simply read through the document and check your work for any overlooked problems before the content is published.

A fresh set of eyes is always helpful when trying to put out error free work. This is because when you expect something to read in a certain way, often times your eyes can overlook any mistakes because they really aren’t looking for them. An outsider doesn’t have this same bias and therefore can more easily detect certain errors.

Proofit4u2 is THE premier site for quality document editing. Proper grammar and punctuation is important to your company will leave a lasting impression on your customers and clients.

We often respond to questions on Yahoo! Answers. The article below is adapted from one of those responses.

Question: Can Someone Check My Grammar?

“There are several factors account for cultural diversity in Europe such as geographical, historical, and religion that prevent the growth of any single homogenous style in the region. The geographical distribution has formed boundaries within the different ethnic groups. Separated by their identity and ideologies, their music has become a signifier of their distinction.”

Answer: This passage is a mess, but the problems go beyond grammar. Let’s look at the sentences one at a time and see how they can be improved.

First, here is the summary of problems we will fix.

Spelling
Sentence subject
Excessive words
Parallelism
Word choice
Dangling modifier
Number agreement
Punctuation/Comma
Sentence One

“There are several factors account for cultural diversity in Europe such as geographical, historical, and religion that prevent the growth of any single homogenous style in the region.”

Spelling: Homogeneous
Subject: “There” always makes a crummy subject for a sentence. Avoid it. Instead, start with “Several factors account….”
Punctuation/commas: The expression “such as geographical, historical, and religion” is a disruptor, i.e., it interrupts the main idea you are communicating. It needs to be separated from the main sentence with commas: “…in Europe, such as geographical, historical, and religion, that prevent….”
Excessive words: “Single” and “homogeneous” are redundant. If the region has a single style, it has a homogeneous style, and vice versa. Choose one. We prefer “single” because it is a simple word.
Parallelism: “Geographical” and “historical” are adjectives. The third item in this series, “religion,” is a noun. All three need to be the same part of speech to make this series parallel. Because you are using these as examples of “factors,” which is a noun, use nouns for the series items: “geography,” “history,” and “religion.”
Sentence Two

“The geographical distribution has formed boundaries within the different ethnic groups.”

Word choice: You can’t have boundaries “within” groups-you have boundaries “between” groups. (Note: “between” is correct here, not “among.” Each boundary is between one group and one other group.)
Excessive words: The word “different” is unnecessary. The use of the plural for “ethnic groups” already indicates that multiple, i.e., different, groups exist.
Sentence Three

“Separated by their identity and ideologies, their music has become a signifier of their distinction.”

Dangling modifier: The implied subject of “Separated by their identity and ideologies” is “they.” The subject of “their music has become a signifier of their distinction” is “music.” Because the subject of the introductory phrase isn’t the same subject as the main sentence, the introductory phrase is a dangling modifier. Both need the same subject. You could use “they” for both, as in “Separated by their identities and ideologies, they have distinct musical styles.”
Number agreement: Each group has its own ideology, so you correctly used the plural for “ideologies.” However, each group also has its own identity, so you also need the plural “identities.”
Final Result

When we take care of all these issues, we get the following revision:

“Several factors account for cultural diversity in Europe, such as geography, history, and religion, that prevent the growth of a single style in the region. The geographical distribution has formed boundaries between ethnic groups. Separated by their identities and ideologies, they have distinct musical styles.”

David Bowman is the Owner and Chief Editor of Precise Edit, a comprehensive editing, proofreading, and document analysis service for authors, students, and businesses. Precise Edit also offers a variety of other services, such as translation, transcription, and website development.

Learn when and how to use the articles ‘a’, ‘an’ and ‘the’ in this English grammar lesson. We will end the lesson with a gap-filling exercise, so you can test your understanding.

Let us know how you did in the comments.

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Articles – a, an & the – English Grammar lesson

Take the quiz – http://www.learnex.in/articles-a-an-the/

The 3 articles in English are a, an and the. The learner has to decide noun-by-noun which one of the articles to use.

In fact, there are 4 choices to make, because sometimes no article is necessary. Native-speakers, of course, use the articles correctly without thinking. English learners, on the other hand, need to have some guidelines for making the right choice – particularly those learners whose own language does not have articles.

The guidelines that follow in this lesson should help ESL students to a basic understanding of English article use.

The words a, an and the are known as articles.
• We use an before words that begin with vowels (a,e,i,o,u).

E.g. I found an orange boat.

However there are few exceptions like the words honest and hour. In the words honest and hour the alphabet h is silent and therefore the letter o becomes the first alphabet of the word and hence we use the article an.

E.g. Mr. Smith is an honest man.
I will be with you in an hour.

We use a before words that begin with consonants (all the letters of the alphabet except the vowels).

E.g. Bumble is a baby elephant.
• We use the before words that we have already spoken about.
E.g. I bought an apple. The apple is very sweet.