Archive for the ‘How To Construct An Article’ Category

Papers & Essays: Crash Course Study Skills #9

Writing research papers is an essential skill in your career as a student, and this week we’re going to help you do that like a pro. From figuring out where to begin, to finding the best systems, to breaking out of “research recursion system” (maybe just figuring out what that means), we’ve got you covered.

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Resources:

How to Write a Great Research Paper by Simon Peyton Jones: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3dkRsTqdDA
How to Become a Straight-A Student by Cal Newport: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/253203.How_to_Become_a_Straight_A_Student
Close Reading and Research: https://collegeinfogeek.com/writing-close-reading-research/
Writing and Editing Tips: https://collegeinfogeek.com/essay-writing-and-editing/

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A Literature Review is an objective, concise, critical summary of published research literature relevant to a topic being researched in an article.

The two most common types of literature reviews found in journals are those introducing research articles (studies and surveys) and stand-alone literature analyses. They differ in their scope, length, and specific purpose.

This video provides a detailed explanation of what do include, what not to include, how to structure, and how to compose a literature review from start to finish.

Related YouTube videos:

“How to Write a Research Paper Introduction” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTC-5P1VFFU)

“Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper”
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcuL_IaRtXc)

“How to Write an Abstract for a Research Paper”
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMEnRBss6V4)

“How to Write a Research Paper Title”
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl1q-I3bE0c)

Wordvice Resources Page

“Useful Phrases for Academic Writing”
(https://wordvice.com/useful-phrases-for-writing-academic-papers/)

“Common Transition Terms in Academic Paper”
(https://wordvice.com/common-transition-terms-used-in-academic-papers/)

“Active and Passive Voice in Research Papers”
(https://wordvice.com/video-should-i-use-active-or-passive-voice-in-a-research-paper/)

“100+ Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing”
(https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/)

“Tips for Paraphrasing in Research Papers”
(https://wordvice.com/a-guide-to-paraphrasing-in-research-papers-apa-ama/)

External Resources
University of Minnesota. “Guidelines for Writing a Literature Review.” (http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html)

The UNC Writing Center. “Literature Reviews.” (https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/literature-reviews/)

Wordvice offers editing services in several languages and countries:

ENGLISH: https://www.wordvice.com
KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr
JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp
CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn
TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw
TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr

Journalism Professor Mark Grabowski explains how to write good leads for your stories. This 30-minute lesson covers summary leads, delayed identification leads and creative leads. For more journalism help or to find a journalism job, visit http://CubReporters.org

CubReporters.org
narrator: Mark Grabowski
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How to write a story | John Dufresne | TEDxFIU

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Take a journey inside a writer’s mind and learn his approach to creating a story.

John Dufresne is the author of five novels, two of which were New York Times Notable Books of the Year, two short story collections and two books on writing and creativity: The Lie That Tells a Truth: a Guide to Writing Fiction and Is Life Like This?: a Guide to Writing Your First Novel in Six Months. The New York Times Book Review wrote of his latest novel, No Regrets, Coyote, “Dufresne is an original talent. His humor is frightfully dark, but also quite dazzling – even by the exacting standards of South Florida crime fiction.” Dufresne was a 2012-13 Guggenheim Fellow and teaches in FIU’s Creative Writing MFA program.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Here take a look at how to construct an article that can be used as web content. This tutorial was brought to you by http://www.MasterResellRights.com
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How to Write an Abstract Step-by-Step (With Examples)

How to Write an Abstract. Once you’re done with your academic paper after months of hard work, you’ll also need to create an abstract of your paper, too. Since this writing summarizes and represents your work, you’ll want it to be picture perfect, right? Lucky for you, we’ve put together some tips on writing the best abstract, so pay close attention!

TIMESTAMPS
Find out the requirements 0:55
Pick the right abstract type 1:42
Consider your readers 3:27
Explain the importance of your research 4:10
Explain the problem and your methods 4:45
Avoid copy-pasting 5:19
Keep it well-structured and logical 6:15
Include key phrases and words 7:00
Sum it up 7:49
Editing and proofreading 8:18

Music:
https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music

SUMMARY
-Whether you’re writing it to apply for a conference, grant, journal publication, or work project, find out if there are any specific requirements regarding its length and style.
-When it comes to abstract types, you have two options to choose from: descriptive versus informative. Normally, descriptive abstracts are written for shorter papers, and informative ones for longer more technical pieces.
-Fellow scholars from the same research field will easily get the ideas and special terminology you use, while average readers or people from another scientific field probably won’t grasp complicated concepts.
-As you get down to actually writing the abstract, there are four key points you wanna hit when explaining the importance of your research to your readers.
-It’s really important to define the scope of your research. It’s imperative that your research has a key claim or argument, which is definitely worth mentioning in the abstract.
-Your abstract should be an independent piece of writing and not a collage of disconnected paraphrased sentences.
-No matter how short it has to be, your abstract should be built according to the usual essay model and have an introduction, body, and conclusion.
-If you want your prospective readers to be able to find your work among millions of publications, adding 5 to 10 important key words or phrases to your abstract will certainly help.
-An informative abstract should explain what answers the research helped you find and if it supported your original argument.
-Check your abstract several times for grammar and spelling, and don’t forget to format it the right way. Another pair of eyes won’t hurt either.

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Sitting down to write a blog post can be daunting. It’s hard to know what to say, how to get your point across, or how many words to use. Tons of questions swirl around in bloggers minds when they are trying to get started. So here is a little tutorial on how to construct an effective blog post.

Read the accompanying blog article:

How To Write A Blog Post For Beginners (And Even Experienced Bloggers)

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