Ethics in Science ; Trends in Research Misconduct on The Rise

Monday, October 17, 2016

Ethics in Science ; Trends in Research Misconduct on The Rise;
Not just an academic issue
• Public health is perhaps most at stake when
medical research is found to be falsified or
fabricated.
• A 2011 article in The Journal of Medical Ethics
reviewed ~200 papers that were retracted due to
questionable data  the published research was
tied to 28,000 patients, 6,573 of whom
received treatment based on the research
presented in the retracted papers (Steen, 2011).
http://ncuraregioni.org/uploads/3/3/6/2/3362892/radg_presentation_final.pdf

JMBE Profiles with Kari Wester is an interview series that highlights the volunteers that comprise the Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education (JMBE) Editorial Board, the authors who contribute their work, and the education innovations that bring them together.

In this third episode of the series, Kari sits down with ASM’s Publishing Ethics Manager, Erika Davies, to discuss the importance of scientific ethics, responsible conduct of research, and trends in research misconduct. Kari and Erika also discuss resources to help educate members and non-members alike about the importance of scientific integrity. The ASM resources mentioned, including JMBE’s Scientific Ethics section and ASM Press’ “Scientific Integrity” (4th Ed.) textbook and “Perspectives on Research Integrity” monograph, can all be found on ASMscience.org. Information regarding image manipulation can be found at asm.org/images/journals/Files/jrn_sample­_images.pdf.

JMBE is ASM’s premier science education publication that provides original, previously unpublished, peer-reviewed articles that foster scholarly teaching and offers readily adoptable resources in biology education. You can read JMBE online for free at ASMscience.org.
Video Rating: / 5

Health Care Reform: Medical Practice and Medical Ethics
Michael Thaler
Tuesdays, 10.am-noon

Revolutionary advances in molecular genetics, organ transplantation, robotics, imaging, and information technologies promise healthier, longer, and more productive lives. But these advances also substantially increase the cost of health care and introduce unprecedented ethical and legal challenges. Address the development of a new biomedical ethics and legal structure to manage care, as well as conflicting demands among traditional humanistic values, modern specialized medical practices, and economic constraints. Examine how the principles of modern bioethics —patient autonomy, beneficence, informed consent, and fairness doctrines — shape and authorize health care in a pluralistic society with aging demographics and growing public health needs. Discussions will be based on actual cases.

Michael Thaler M.D., professor emeritus at UCSF, trained in medicine, pediatrics, and history of health sciences. He has authored more than 200 scientific and clinical articles and is the recipient of prestigious awards for medical research and public service. His areas of interest include application of scientific advances to clinical practice, medical ethics, and future delivery of health care to seniors.

For more information, visit http://olli.berkeley.edu.

One Comment

  1. Lance Winslow says:

    What an apologetic for academic misconduct – these arrogant academics are such complete hypocrites. They act more holier than now, and point fingers at every other sector of our economy.

Leave a Reply