Posts Tagged ‘change’

Climate change has become a frequently discussed issue over the past years, but in the last year there has been more and more discussion about it. The reason for this is that there is scarcely a day which goes by now without there being a major news story about unusual weather patterns.

Just this Summer and Autumn (2007), we have seen floods in the UK, and in the US. Drought in parts of Australia has been even more acute that usual, and Greece and California have experienced massive forest fires. However, by far the most dramatic has been the completely unexpected extent of the melting of the north west passage in the Arctic, and we have all seen the satellite images showing a much shrunken ice cap right across the whole Arctic region.

Global climate change is the single biggest environmental threat facing the planet. Climate change can occur naturally, and many argue that despite the majority scientific view that the cause is human activity, the cause is natural. Others argue that the increase on carbon dioxide in the atmosphere sounds as if it has risen hugely, the actual amount compared with the other gases is still very small. They reason that as it is still a very small proportion of our atmosphere, how could it be having the effect attributed to it?

Nevertheless, despite questions of this sort, the climate change or global warming we have seen does match the rise in human population and activity since the start of the industrial revolution, and it would be a rare man indeed who could deny that. Hence, most of us are beginning to accept global warming as a reality, and furthermore that human caused climate change is a fact.

Climate change impacts will range from affecting agriculture, further endangering food security, sea-level rise and the accelerated erosion of coastal zones, plus increasing intensity of natural weather extremes. The reality of climate change, and mankind’s causal role in the process, are facts that must now be universally accepted.

Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are likely to further accelerate the rate of climate change. Sadly, it will be the poor, the young, and the weak who will suffer most. Children in developing countries are likely to face the greatest risks from climate change.

Nevertheless, we should not despair. There is much to be done, and much that can be done which will make a difference. The Kyoto Protocol is the international plan to reduce climate change pollution. Europe has led the diplomatic efforts which produced the Kyoto agreement. It is far from perfect but it is the only show in town which can produce change in the developing nations.

Rich countries, like the US and Australia don’t want to take action to stop climate change. That is understandable, as their economies will suffer if it puts heavy extra costs on businesses. It is argued that it is not proven yet that the extra burden will actually yield the degree of improved sustainability our globe will need in order to recover in time to avoid the worst effects. Yet, such sentiments are becoming less common.

Such ideas have been strongest in the US. However, former US vice-president Gore now shares the Nobel peace prize for his work on climate change. An election campaign is starting for George Bush’s successor, and even Bush is mellowing toward active support of climate change alleviation policies.

Across the whole US, local governments are also increasingly addressing climate change with their own solutions, giving much room for optimism.

It was decided at Kyoto that the developed nations would reduce their emissions, and that they would also pay the developing nations to avoid or reduce their rising emissions of carbon dioxide. It was reasoned that the best way to get this to work would be to create a market out of “carbon credits”, the carbon tonnages saved by investment from the west. The market would allow the high carbon emitting companies in the developed nations offset their continued emissions at home by paying for emissions savings overseas. This would have the additional benefit of raising the income of the poorest nations.

The British government, which is convinced that climate change has to be tackled, is leading the United Kingdom in its ambitious self-set targets for emissions reductions. Many other European nations also have similar policies in place. Scandinavian countries are even more advanced in their emissions reductions programmes than the UK.

So, the science is clear: climate change is happening, and it is linked directly to human activity. To bring climate change to a halt, global greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced significantly. But by how much, and how soon must we change our habits?

Many of the temperature data and computer models used to predict climate change are themselves uncertain, but experts now agree that the world needs to react very quickly now, or the problem of control will become exponentially more difficult.

The cost associated with the effects of climate change is projected to increase substantially over time with rising temperatures, and the longer we delay the worse it will be. To state that is simple common sense.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is one of the organisations which is working globally and in the UK to raise awareness about the causes and impacts of climate change and the available solutions. Wildlife organisations stress that biodiversity will be severely affected by climate change and sea-level rise, with an increased risk of extinction of very many species.

For some species however, the climate will be good, but at great human cost. The unobtrusive mosquito’s story illustrates a sobering consequence of climate change. Fewer frosts and generally warmer temperatures will allow the spread of diseases like malaria into more temperate climates. The species best suited to adapting may not be the ones people want to survive.

In general, we can reduce our demands on nature and the tonnages of carbon dioxide emitted by adopting sustainable development. Sustainable development can increase the capacity for adaptation and mitigation, and reduce vulnerability of societies to the impacts of climate change. Humans are already adapting to climate change, and further adaptation efforts will be necessary during coming decades.

New technologies are part of man’s adaptation and are being developed which are ‘green’ and will help reduce or even reverse climate change effects. These technologies will help us to be better stewards of the environment, and they will help us to confront the serious challenge of global climate change.

There is much that can be done to stop catastrophic climate change but decisive action is needed from governments and industry now. Today, action is occurring at every level to reduce, to avoid, and to better understand the risks associated with climate change.

Climate Change for Better or Worse is a web site which was launched to help you understand what climate change is and how you can take action to combat it. Without action, climate change will cause the extinction of countless species and destroy some of the world’s most precious ecosystems, putting millions of people at risk. Diseases, declining crop yields, and natural disasters are just a few of the other impacts of climate change that could follow and devastate the world’s most vulnerable communities.

Delaying emission reduction measures limits the opportunities to achieve low stabilization levels and increases the risk of severe climate change impacts. Please act now to encourage your politicians to take urgent action.

If you hold sympathy with this article, and found it interesting, we are sure that you will enjoy, even more, a visit to our web site. Just continue down this page and follow the link below, and discover how you can take amazing action to make a difference.

Steve Evans is an environmental consultant and expert visit his web site at the Climate Change for Better or Worse – Articles Index page

He is a also a regular contributor of dog breed related articles, such as those at The Dog Breeds Compendium – Adopting a Shelter Dog page

Climate Change 101 with Bill Nye | National Geographic

Climate Change is a real and serious issue. In this video Bill Nye, the Science Guy, explains what causes climate change, how it affects our planet, why we need to act promptly to mitigate its effects, and how each of us can contribute to a solution.
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Global warming, and climate change, is a subject which shows zero sign of cooling down.   Here’s the lowdown on why it’s occurring, what’s inflicting it, and the way it may well modify the planet.

Is It Taking place?

Yes. Earth is currently screening numerous symbols of worldwide climate change.

• Average temperatures have climbed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degree  Celsius) all over the world since 1880, a good bit of this in recent decades,  in accordance with NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

• The interest rate of warming is rising. The 20th century’s last twenty years  seem to have been the hottest in 400 years and possibly the warmest for numerous  millennia, according to various climate studies. And the United  Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports that  11 of the previous 12 years may be among the many dozen warmest since 1850.

• The Arctic is feeling the consequences the most. Average temperatures in  Alaska, western Canada, in addition to eastern Russia have risen at double the  global average, according to the multinational Arctic Climate Effect  Assessment report compiled within 2000 and 2004.

• Arctic ice is rapidly disappearing, and the district may have the first of all wholly ice-free summer by 2040 or even earlier. Polar bears and indigenous cultures are already tormented by the sea-ice damage.

• Glaciers and mountain snows are speedily melting—for instance, Montana’s Glacier National Park presently possess only 27 glaciers, versus 150 in 1910. Inside the Northern  Hemisphere, thaws also come a week earlier in spring and even freezes start a  week later.

Is Human beings Inflicting It?

The report, based on the effort of some 2,500 scientists in additional comparing to 130  countries, concluded that humans have brought on all or most of the current  planetary warming. Human-caused global warming is often known as  anthropogenic climate change.

• Industrialization, deforestation, as well as pollution have intensely increased  atmospheric concentrations of water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, as well as  nitrous oxide, all greenhouse gases that help block warmth close Earth’s  surface.

• People are pouring carbon dioxide to the atmosphere much quicker than plants and oceans might absorb it.

• These gases persist in the surroundings for years, that means that even if the mentioned emissions have been eliminated now, it might not instantly finish global warming.

• Many professionals indicate that organic cycles in Earth’s orbit might change  the planet’s hype to sunlight, which might clarify the current model.  Earth have certainly experienced warming and cooling cycles harshly every  hundred thousand years because of those orbital shifts, but such alterations  have occurred along the span of several centuries. Today’s alterations have  taken place over the past hundred years or fewer.

What’s Going to Happen?

A follow-up describe warned that global warming could lead on to large-scale food and water shortages and still have catastrophic effects on nature.

• Sea level could mount within 7 and 23 inches (18 to 59 centimeters) by means of  century’s end. Rises of just four  inches (10 centimeters) might flood a number of South Seas islands and swamp  big parts of Southeast Asia.

• Glaciers around the world could melt, inflicting sea levels to rise while  creating water shortages in areas depending on runoff for clean  water.

• Powerful hurricanes, droughts, heat waves, wildfires, as well as other natural  disasters may turn out to be conventional in many parts of the world. The expansion  of deserts may also cause food shortages in lots of areas.

• More than 1 000 000 species face extinction from disappearing territory, changing ecosystems, and acidifying oceans

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Truth Shocking Facts|Global Warming & Climate Change

Truth Shocking Facts|Global Warming & Climate Change

Why is it so hard to make lasting changes in our companies, in our communities, and in our own lives?

The primary obstacle is a conflict that’s built into our brains, say Chip and Dan Heath, authors of the critically acclaimed bestseller Made to Stick. Psychologists have discovered that our minds are ruled by two different systems—the rational mind and the emotional mind—that compete for control. The rational mind wants a great beach body; the emotional mind wants that Oreo cookie. The rational mind wants to change something at work; the emotional mind loves the comfort of the existing routine. This tension can doom a change effort—but if it is overcome, change can come quickly.

In Switch, the Heaths show how everyday people—employees and managers, parents and nurses—have united both minds and, as a result, achieved dramatic results:
● The lowly medical interns who managed to defeat an entrenched, decades-old medical practice that was endangering patients.
● The home-organizing guru who developed a simple technique for overcoming the dread of housekeeping.
● The manager who transformed a lackadaisical customer-support team into service zealots by removing a standard tool of customer service

In a compelling, story-driven narrative, the Heaths bring together decades of counterintuitive research in psychology, sociology, and other fields to shed new light on how we can effect transformative change. Switch shows that successful changes follow a pattern, a pattern you can use to make the changes that matter to you, whether your interest is in changing the world or changing your waistline.
Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard
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Last week we traveled to Denver, CO. to shoot with 5X Mr. Olympia Phil Heath after he returned to the states after a 7 week European Tour. On the first day Phil took us through one of his off season arm routines at Armbrust Pro Gym. Stay tuned for more videos of Phil!

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Have you always dreamed of working in the information technology field? If so, you are not alone. Many people are working dead-end jobs only to realize there is no job security. They work long, hard hours and sometimes without benefits. Many people are realizing how the information technology field creates job security and better lives. It is no wonder viewing how great financial security is in the IT field that you want to change your career goal.

Many people in different situation are seeking to change their careers. Some people are already in the information technology field and looking to join other companies while staying in the information technology field. Others are not working in the technology field and some want to earn some form of IT degrees. If you were unhappy in your current job, it would probably be a great idea to change your career. Loving your job while being paid to do it is what everyone should aim for.

Great advice before you change your career to the IT field is that you should be ready to constantly evolve because that is precisely what the IT field is doing. The IT field is never dormant, ever changing and you must be flexible and willing to change right along with the field of IT.

There are jobs in Information Technology to fit most any personality. If you enjoy being around people or you do not have great people skills, there is virtually jobs for almost every personality type in the Information Technology field.

Do not think for a second that your past experience or education will not prove relevant to the IT field. The IT field exists in any industry therefore; make sure you realize how valuable your background is as you change your career. Your knowledge and background will only make you an asset considering you are interested in the IT field.

James Copper is a writer for where you can find information on how to get a career in IT

Change Management is not easy. It is a painful process that requires the Project Manager to be both a warrior and a diplomat. You will need an arsenal of quality tools, and well honed soft skills to make it through managing a change with little or no collateral damage. I am sure you think I am exaggerating. Here’s why I am not:

1. You will have 3 factions to deal with:

A key group of stakeholders will think the change is vital to the success of the project (they may or may not be right) and will be unwilling to budge until the change is agreed upon and implemented.
Another group will have no capacity to absorb the change without additional funding and/or time.
Leadership. You are not likely to get more time. You may or may not get additional funding, but more funding is not likely to help without crashing the schedule anyway until new resources are brought up to speed.

It’s even more fun when the stakeholders who want the change are also leadership. I’m sure you’ve heard, “Just get it done” before.

2. Most people are naturally resistant to change:

Once headed in a particular direction, it’s at least irritating and often demoralizing to people who have to change direction or start over. Maintaining positive energy in the ranks is a challenge, especially if things keep changing.

3. Someone ultimately is going to be unhappy about the final decision.

In the end though, change is natural and will happen. You will be successful if:

You clearly set expectations about how change will be managed early in the project.
Decisions to make or not make a change are well informed decisions.

Key Strategies for Managing Change

Plan your butt off and define scope extremely well. Strong planning around solid scope definition is a key to minimizing unexpected change down the road.
Force quality requirements development. Don’t even think about design or engineering before you have a high level of confidence that requirements are solid and well understood. If you inherit requirements, make everyone review them and agree to them again before going too far into design. You will be pressured to run ahead because things will appear stagnant during requirements engineering. Trust me, stand your ground. It will pay off down the road.
Plan for change. It will happen regardless of how well you do 1-2 above. Developing a simple to follow process as part of your plan will help set the expectation for everyone and make it easy for you to act swiftly when the time comes.
Get the following key stakeholders to agree/sign-off on your project plan and requirements. This won’t always help when the rubber hits the road, but it does put everyone on a level playing field when that first change request comes in:
The Project Sponsor. This person will be like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde when it comes to change depending on which faction has his/her ear. If you can at least get agreement for your change management process, you will minimize snap decisions that can de-rail your project.
Engineering/Development Managers. This group will be moderately resistant to change without additional time or funding. They will be protective of their teams and will push back on requiring their people to work additional hours. Assuring them that no decisions will be made without their input will keep them from assuming a defensive posture and help drive collaboration when the time comes.
Quality Assurance or Test Managers. This group always gets screwed when it comes to change. No wiggle room in the schedule often means shortening of the QA cycle. They know it, and are already on the defensive. Incorporating quality considerations into your change management process will enable this group to describe risks to quality when certain decisions are made. While this may not ultimately change the final decision, at least this group will have been at the table with a voice.

The Change Management Plan

This section of your project plan needs to include the following:

Clear criteria for when the change management process is required
Roles and responsibilities
A simple step by step procedure that includes how to perform these key steps:
Requesting the change
Impact assessment
Exploring alternatives
Making the final decision
Drafting the tactical plan to incorporate the change and get back on track

In addition, you will need to have standard templates/tools in place ahead of time to help manage the change when the time comes.

A Change Management form or template.
A SWORD Analysis (a future article)
A Change Management Log

Change Management Criteria

The change management process is required when a requested change will likely have any impact on project scope, increase in schedule, increase in cost, or degradation of quality.

Other texts may say that ANY impact to schedule or cost require the change management procedure to be executed. I personally disagree, but you can decide for yourself.

Roles and Responsibilities

Every project should have a predefined Change Control Board (CCB) that includes at least the Project Manager, Project Sponsor, Development/Engineering Managers, and QA/Test Managers.

Your projects may require additional roles. Here are some quick guidelines:

Roles should be included if they have resources assigned to the project, human resources, HW/SW resources, financial resources, etc.
Roles should be included if they are managing projects that have dependencies on your project, or vice versa.
Roles should be included if they have oversight across multiple related projects, i.e. Program Managers or Release Managers.

Each member of the CCB will have different responsibilities. Here are some examples:

Project Manager(s)

Document the change request
Manage the change request through the process
Facilitate the CCB meetings
Incorporate approved change requests into the project

Project Sponsor(s)

Attend CCB Meetings
Make final decision to approve or reject each change request

HR managers for resources assigned to projects and System managers managing systems impacted by your project

Perform Impact Assessments as requested
Attend CCB Meetings
Participate in implementation planning for approved change requests

Release/Program Managers

Drive Impact Assessment for dependent projects
Attend CCB meetings
Participate in implementation planning for approved change requests

Impact Assessment

This is the most important piece of managing a change request. A quality impact assessment will drive an informed decision and, when the change request is approved, will ensure smooth introduction of the change into the in-flight project. Do this well.

Each group/team represented in your project and dependent projects will need to complete an Impact Assessment. Simply put, this is an estimate of additional cost and/or duration that team will incur if the change is approved. This information is compiled from all teams and then brought to the Change Control Board meeting for discussion and decision.

Exploring Alternatives

Very often, a person requesting a change will be very focused on exactly what he/she wants for a solution, and will not clearly articulate what the problem is that needs to be solved. Because of this, you should always go through the exercise of exploring alternatives. A good branistorming exercise with key stakeholders almost always results in a creative solution that will result in less drama that the originally proposed solution. This is because everyone has had a chance to voice opinion, and will be more willing to compromise. Look for another article by me titled, “SWORD Analysis, SWOT with an Edge” where I discuss a great method for exploring alternatives.

Making the Final Decision

Now that you have all of the information compiled, the final decision is made. If you have done everything up to this point as described above, the decision is simply a formality. More often than not, the decision was already made during Exploring Alternatives. But in very rare cases, it’s not so simple. In cases like that, you will need to call upon your sponsor to make the final call.

Drafting the Tactical Plan

OK – so now you have an approved change request. The final step – implement the change. Simple? Not quite.

Think of a change as a small project within the project. As such, you will need to have a plan for how the change will be implemented. This plan should contain many of the sections of the project plan, but very simplified. Your plan to implement the change should be a single page document or less.

Here are the sections you will need:

Roles and Responsibilities
Tasks, including who is assigned, and when it is due
Status reporting plan – how people can expect to be notified of the progress

The Log

Finally, you will need to track the progress of all of your change requests so that you can manage several at once, as well as keeping everyone in the know about them. Your log should contain the following sections:

ID – Simple numbering suffices
Title – A short title describing the change
Description – a paragraph that describes the change in more detail
Requestor – The name of the person requesting the change
status – Requested, Assessed, Alternatives Explored, Accepted/Rejected, Implemented (if accepted)

Add more if you like, but these are the primary sections.

Phew! I know it seems like a lot, but trust me, you will need to get good at this. Strong change management skills are what will separate good project managers from great project managers.

Keep reading and I’ll keep writing!


Steve Yuhas is an accomplished project manager with a focus on efficient software engineering through data driven process improvement and simplification. He has applied his skills to a variety of industries, and has most recently begun some personal ventures like

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With such an army of workers as our youth, rightly trained, might furnish, how soon the message of a crucified, risen, and soon-coming Savior might be carried to the whole world! How soon might the end come–the end of suffering and sorrow and sin! How soon, in place of a possession here, with its blight of sin and pain, our children might receive their inheritance where “the righteous shall inherit the land, and dwell therein forever;” where “the inhabitant shall not say, I am sick,” and “the voice of weeping shall be no more heard.” Psalm 37:29; Isaiah 33:24; 65:19. {Education, page 271.2}
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“Current Affairs” is the most sought after discipline not only by students but also by various professionals. Learning Space tracks Current Affairs in a most comprehensive way week after week starting from 1st January 2015.

Every week in our videos, we discuss “the chronology of important events with details” in a Main Events Format,
“detailed narration of science & technology, health & environment “ issues in a “S&T, Health & Environment” format, “in-depth analysis of important events” in a News Analysis Format, “accurate and deep understanding” in an Insight Format, “General and Banking Awareness Events” in a Question and Answer Format and
“News at a Glance” with a brief explanation. Hence, every week Current Affairs will have six modules.

This video is the “S&T, Health & Environment” for the period of 21st Mar to 27th Mar, 2016.
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A straightforward explanation of Climate Change: the heat from human emissions is roughly equal to exploding 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs every day. Historically, every time carbon dioxide levels increase in Earth’s atmosphere, the average surface temperature increases, ice melts, and the seas rise.

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