Posts Tagged ‘Changing’

Hasan A. Yahya, PhDs. A writer from Michigan, USA.

It’s no surprise that fast food plays a large part in the diet of most Americans. We’ve seen the effects that dietary degradation can have upon our health. More  and more children, from 3 to 9 are suffering from obesity. A good portion of pre-school children are overweight. Children that are overweight are at an increased risk for health problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes and other conditions. Parents often complain that their children are picky eaters. And they  should re-evaluate the eating habits of the whole family. It is time for mothers to try new ways to produce and present food to their children. Here are some ways to change your child habits of eating:

Keep in mind that more calories don’t necessarily mean more nutrition. Ask your child for his or her opinion.
Write a list of your child’s favorite foods then look through recipes for different ways to prepare those foods while integrating new foods into your meals.
It is normal to receive your child rejection to some foods, your child will not like every food you serve. That’s okay. Like yourself, probably certain foods that you don’t like. So, your child doesn’t have to like every food in order to eat healthy.
Let them share food preparing: Get the kids  involved. Let them help you prepare a meal.  Prepare a food that you normally don’t include in your regular meals. Try a new recipe.
You are the role model for your children: Set a good example for your children through your own healthy eating habits. Break up the mealtime routine.
The factor of child personality:  Your child personality  plays a great role when it comes to how he or she will respond to new foods. It’s important to understand your child’s personality as you are offering up a world of food to her/him.  Children usually respond by behaving in the way that gets them attention. If they are labeled as picky, as they will act that way and thus exacerbate the problem. Specialists suggest that you try not to react dramatically  if your child turns his nose up to a food and resist the urge to label him as ‘the hater of all that is green.’  He will pick up on your reaction and repeat his behavior again and again.
There are ways to help children expand their dietary delights. Keep trying new dishes. Add a variety of foods. Don’t get stuck in the rut of preparing the same meals repeatedly. If children say they don’t like a particular food encourage them to taste it but don’t try to force them to eat it. Try the same food again at a later time or use the same food in a different way.
Repetition of providing food several times:  Research shows that it takes 8 to 15 times of introducing a new food to a child for him to accept it. This means  that you need to offer that food an average of 10 times before your child will consider eating it. 
 Studies have shown that food preferences are shaped between the ages of three and five.  In many cases, be patient, and repeat doing the same thing one more time. Sure! you will succeed. (571 words) wwwaskdryahya.com

Sources: http://livingstonparentjournal.com/

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/125373/how_to_change_your_childs_eating_habits_pg2.html?cat=25

Professor, Dr. Hasan A. Yahya is an Arab American writer, scholar, and professor of Sociology lives in the United States of America,  originally from Palestine. He graduated from Michigan State University with  2 Ph.d degrees. He published 65 books plus , and 500 plus articles on sociology, religion, psychology, politics, poetry, and short stories. Philosophically, his writings concern logic, justice and human rights worldwide. Dr. Yahya is the author of Crescentologism: The Moon Theory,  and  Islam Finds its Way, on Amazon. He’s an expert on Race Relations, Arab and Islamic cultures, he is also, interested in religion, world affairs and  global strategic planning for justice and human rights. www.dryahyatv.com

Personal technology is paving the way for a new era for healthcare that is changing the way we make medical decisions and how we receive treatment. This video explains the rising trend of remote healthcare and how it has allowed for better administration of treatment for patients at their homes.

Sources:
Harvard Business Review, Personalized Technology Will Shift the Doctor-Patient Relationship

Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute, Emerging Patient-Driven Health Care Models: An Examination of Health Social Networks, Consumer Personalized Medicine and Quantified Self-Tracking, http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/6/2/492/htm

Phys.Org, Digital natives push for personalized healthcare technology, http://phys.org/news/2015-11-digital-natives-personalized-healthcare-technology.html

Rock Health, The Future of Personalized Healthcare: Predictive Analytics, https://rockhealth.com/reports/predictive-analytics/

The Wall Street Journal, How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care, http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-telemedicine-is-transforming-health-care-1466993402

Healthy Debate, Telemedicine on the rise across Canada, http://healthydebate.ca/2015/06/topic/telemedicine-across-canada

The King’s Fund, Transforming our health care system, https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/files/kf/field/field_publication_file/10PrioritiesFinal2.pdf

Changing consumer behavior is being attributed, in large part to new consumer values. The emerging narrative is, quite literally, taking over the conversation between consumers and corporations trying to catch their attention. We are all familiar with the themes. Green, sustainable, community, connection, consciousness, globalism and so on. Sounds like we can all congratulate ourselves on being a more enlightened people but I’m having a hard time swallowing it.

What are these new values and what relationship do they really have with how we spend our money and develop brand loyalty? I think that values are self defined, self endowed virtues that we use to positively interpret our own behavior. Badges, as it were, invented by our aspirations and pinned, by our ego’s, onto our identities where they shine for all the world to see. The gap between the energy we are prepared to invest in defending our values and the effort we make actually employing them is so broad as to make it clear that values are both deeply important to us yet entirely optional from a practical standpoint. They are permissive and don’t carry the performance requirements of, say, principles which must always be applied to hold true. On a list of needs to wants, values would fall into the “nice to have” section.

By way of illustration, as if a good hard look at all of our own personal lives wasn’t enough, consider how enraptured we are with stories of self sacrifice and lofty deeds. This is because they are the heroic tales of values actually winning out over self interest and that is rare indeed. Values allow us to positively interpret our self interested behavior so it is no surprise that they have come to dominate the narrative between business and the consumer. What is surprising however is that more people don’t recognize that this narrative is somewhat of a “tea party conversation” that skirts the real, if less flattering, motivations behind our choices. That does not make the narrative any less useful as it pertains to branding, marketing and communications in general, but it does mean that it is only part of the picture. It makes sense for corporations to fill in the blanks if they want to address the real concerns and motivations of their customers.
So what are consumers experiencing right now? How do they feel and what are their new values an expression of? What do they need or want to hear from business to address the actuality of their lives in these highly volatile and transitional times? There are no definitive answers to these questions but they are the questions that companies need to be asking themselves if they want to engage in the values narrative with consumers in a way that also connects with their stronger, more basic motivations.

I think the values that are emerging are all, ultimately, based on a nation wide sense of uncertainty. To put it bluntly; Fear. Fear of what exactly? Grossly simplified; fear of scarcity and fear of threat. Scarcity (or the recognition of it, despite being the first law of economics, has only very recently shown up in the American consumer psyche. For the first time we are realizing that our consumption habits are unsustainable and do not support our long term, or even sort term, well being. Realization did not come in the form of enlightenment but in the growing cost of, food, fuel, housing and so on. The impact of climate change, water and air pollution and the growing prevalence of things like asthma, autism, allergies and so on in our kids has strengthened our grasp on the concept of scarcity. Our rational response is to conserve and ration. The value system that validates that behavior is environmentalism and sustainability. The values are very real but they are not our primary motivator. We are, on a much more primitive level, afraid of running out of the things that we rely on.

The second set of values are based are a response to perceived threat. A convergence of events has made us feel exposed and vulnerable. We have come under attack and lost our sense of security within our boarders. We have had to relinquish the moral high ground and seen our economic superiority threatened by the rise of India and China. Our economy went from very strong to very weak in an extraordinarily short period of time to the very real economic detriment of millions of Americans. Our, once again, completely rational response is to develop somewhat of a wartime mentality. To gather together and form communities. To be more tolerant and less arrogant towards our neighbors whose strength is growing relative to our own. The primary motivator is fear and the value system that it represents is all about relationships, engagement, diplomacy, tolerance, community, connectedness and globalization. Probably the best expression of this shift is the election of Barack Obama to be President. We put aside old prejudices and a value system structured around superiority and replaced it with one that fits better with conditions over which we have no control and no choice but to adapt.

So in conclusion, I would suggest that changing consumer values are the symptom and not the cause of changing economic, social and environmental conditions. Corporations seeking to connect with consumers today should absolutely engage in the values narrative but should do so with the understanding that it is the result of what amounts to fear and insecurity. How do you talk to a consumer who is fearful and insecure? You have the conversation with them about values that they want to have because it makes them feel comfortable and virtuous. You also acknowledge, explicitly or implicitly, the actuality of their experience and the challenges that they are facing. Without that, the narrative around values remains vaguely insubstantial and somehow fails to get to the heart of the matter.

Written by Sara Batterby
Brand and Messaging Strategist
http://www.akelventures.com

The Selected Topics in Internal Medicine (STIM) conference held January 25-29, 2016, covers some of the most common problems encountered in clinical practice with focus on clinical pearls and practice updates.

►Course Information: https://ce.mayo.edu/internal-medicine/content/28th-annual-selected-topics-internal-medicine-2016/?mc_id=youtube&SiteTarget=MoreInfo
►Register Now: https://ce.mayo.edu/internal-medicine/content/28th-annual-selected-topics-internal-medicine-2016/?mc_id=youtube&SiteTarget=Register
►Upcoming Courses: https://ce.mayo.edu/internal-medicine/node/1605/?mc_id=youtube&SiteTarget=STIM16

Presenters:
Diane Birnbaumer, M.D.
Mel Herbert, M.D.
Jerome Hoffman, M.D.
W. Richard Bukata, M.D.

Using primarily the Emergency Medical Abstracts database of nearly 15,000 abstracts, and focusing on the literature primarily of the last five years, 36 presentations, each of 30-minute duration, are presented along with four 90-minute faculty panels. The topics chosen to be addressed are determined by faculty input and feedback from prior registrants. Using largely a question/answer format, the focus of the course is the new, the controversial and the provocative. The course faculty synthesize the literature and combine it with their clinical experience to provide participants with specific recommendations regarding diagnosis and therapy related to emergency care.

Just some ramblings about the current state of my injuries and other personal stuff going on “behind the scenes”.

Since I mentioned investing funds into cutting targets (ZGB zombie heads and ballistic gel), this is the Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/skallagrim

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G’day Everyone! Enjoy this little chitchat style vlog.

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Stardust + Haunted

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5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now

Your brain may never be the same!
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Further Reading–

Abnormal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Internet Addiction Disorder: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030253

Phantom vibrations among undergraduates: Prevalence and associated psychological characteristics
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563212000799

Cognitive control in media multitaskers
http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15583.abstract?sid=113b39d8-d0b5-4f46-b2a5-362ee79d0b61

Amygdala Volume and Social Network Size in Humans
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3079404/

What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward
learning, or incentive salience?
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/research&labs/berridge/publications/Berridge&RobinsonBrResRev1998.pdf
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