Posts Tagged ‘Children’

Presenting SHORT STORY for CHILDREN, a collection of 15 Moral Stories by Kids Hut.

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(✿‿✿) HELLO KIDS you are enjoying SHORT STORIES for KIDS by Kids Hut.


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Famous DISNEY Child Stars Who Grew Up Too Fast

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Do you look the same as you did when you were younger? Sure, there are some recognizable traits, but overall, we look pretty different. When it comes to Disney child stars, there are some iconic faces that we have in our heads when we think of certain movies and TV shows. We often dont think about what happens to that child star after they grow up. Some play their cards right and manage to shed their innocent image and are able to be taken more seriously. This means that they can be cast in more adult roles and their careers will continue. But there are other Disney alums that decide that they are satisfied with their time on screen and retire. As we all know, time goes by and we all grow up. Sure, it would be nice to be like Peter Pan and never grow up. Unlike us regular folks, these stars will be forever young and immortalized through their work for Disney. This might be why when we see them today, it is a true shock because it shatters our perceptions.

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In fact there is quite a bit of poverty in America, and this includes over 14 million children whose parents can’t afford to feed them regularly and can’t provide proper clothing, education, or health care. Unfortunately, many people believe that those who live in poverty are just stupid or lazy.

Do you really think that all of the children living in poverty are stupid and lazy? Even if it was true for their parents, which it isn’t, it is absolutely not true about the children. They are victims of circumstances that are totally beyond their control.

In the current economy, one factory shut-down can cause hundreds of intelligent, hard-working adults to be out of jobs. Unless another factory of a similar type is hiring, most of those workers are not trained to fill the types of jobs that are available. The cost of living continues to increase, and people who no longer have employment are hard-pressed to stay afloat.

Soon, homes are foreclosed on and families are out of luck. Even though the families are struggling together, it is the children who are pushed into poverty who are the innocent victims. If the cycle continues, and years of unemployment ensue, then the children have little, if any, chance of breaking out to improve things. With limited education, employment is also limited. With limited health-care, untreated illness or injury may adversely impact the ability to work.

All of this said, what is a person who truly cares about others to do? The best place to start is by helping the children. Those who cannot help themselves need the most help from others. The children who are in poverty can be helped by volunteers working with church or community groups. Many groups of this type work to alleviate the suffering of the poor children of their communities. Other charitable organizations have developed to help poverty-stricken children. They accept tax-deductable donations and use them carefully to give the biggest benefit to the children who need them.

Whether you can donate time, money, or both, the children of America need you. Yes, there are starving children in Africa, but there may be starving children within a few miles of your home. Give them the help they need and deserve by locating your favorite charitable institution that helps poor children and donating today.

The American Relief Foundation invites you to help us provide poor children around America with support they need. If you lost your car title and cannot donate we have an excellent resource to link you directly to your DMV page to order a duplicate car title. We are looking for a Harris, TX Car Donation to help our cause. If you have an unwanted car consider a charity car donation

Teaching your child tolerance makes moral sense, as well as economic sense. In this era of rapid globalization, it is likely that your child will grow up to interact and do business with people from vastly different cultures from different corners of the world. Helping children adapt to different peoples and cultures with genuine respect and comfort will likely expand their opportunities and success in life. Tolerance is not simply tolerating differences among people, but refers to a broad respect and appreciation. The following strategies will teach your child to value difference, rather than fear it.

1.It is OK to talk about differences.
Tolerance is not about pretending everybody is the same. Teach your child that it is OK to recognize and discuss differences. People have different beliefs, look differently, and have different customs. These differences arent good or bad, per se, they are simply different. Curiosity is fine as long it is accompanied by an attitude of respect and not judgment.

2.Expose your child to diversity.
Perhaps the best way to develop an appreciation of diversity is through exposure. Exposure to others teaches the anxious child not to fear differences. Whether it is through school, an extracurricular activity or travel, encourage your child to interact with different kinds of people, and be positive about cross cultural friendships.

3.Bear witness to the commonalities of the human condition.
People from all cultures have families, care for children, work hard, and exhibit kindness and loyalty to their loved ones. So while people vary tremendously in terms of beliefs, culture and traditions there is an underlying humanity which unites us all. Look for points of connection on this deeper level, and discuss them with your children.

4.Get to Know Individuals
Reject stereotypes and get to know people from other cultures as individuals. Recognize the tremendous variation within a culture, and dont be presumptuous about what people are like or what they value. Let the individual show you who they are, just as you would with someone within your own culture.

5.Educate yourself and your children.
Learn about other cultures, lifestyles, and religions. This can be done through travel, movies, books and food, or simply by having your culturally different neighbors to dinner.

6.Model tolerance.
Long before you introduce your child to the concept of tolerance, he will have been observing your interactions with the world. Do you stick with your own kind or do you interact with and befriend people from diverse backgrounds? Do you demonstrate fear or reticence around people who look differently, have a different religion, or different sexual orientation? Do you get to know people for who they are, and reject stereotypes?

Cindy Jett, LICSW is a psychotherapist and author of Harry the Happy Caterpillar Grows, an acclaimed picture book that helps the anxious child face his fears and helps children adapt to change.

One of the most important tasks of parenting is to help children become independent, so that as adults, they can take care of themselves and pursue their dreams. Teaching independence is a long process, beginning in toddlerhood and (hopefully) ending sometime in early adulthood. These skills will help children adapt to new circumstances over the course of a lifetime. Below are some tips to help kids develop independence as they mature.

1.Give children increasing responsibility.

Teach children that they are important contributors to the family, and give them age appropriate chores. When they are five years old, they may help to fold the laundry, when they are ten they may help with yard work, when they are fifteen, they may help prepare family meals. As children approach their later teen years, they should know how to do most household chores (cooking, cleaning, laundry, and yard work); so that when they leave home they are ready to function independently.

2.Encourage kids to try things themselves first.

At times parents over function for kids, and kids become trained to ask for help rather than try things themselves. Whenever a child asks for help, if it is a task that you believe he can do on his own, ask him to try to do it himself first. If he tries, and doesnt know how to complete a task, offer him help, but teach him how to do the task rather than doing it for him.

3.Teach kids to solve their own disputes.

Young children will often ask parents to solve disputes between siblings or friends. When children are very young, this is an appropriate role for parents. However, once children develop problem solving ability, encourage them to work out issues among themselves, and to approach you only if someone is in danger or the problem is intractable. If you do step in to help a child work out a dispute with a sibling or friend, act as an arbitrary in a negotiation so that you are modeling how to problem solve with others. If there is any bullying or abuse involved in the dispute, assume an authoritative role and discipline the offending child as needed.

4.Teach kids how to manage money.

Teach kids how to handle money, including earning money, saving money, prioritizing spending, and giving to others. When they are very young, you can begin be teaching them to save a portion of their money, spend a portion and perhaps donate a portion of by helping with special tasks. By the time kids are teenagers, they should be able to understand how to make a simple budget. Having kids earn their own spending money during the high school years with a part time job, is a great way to introduce them to the real world of providing for oneself.

5.Teach kids to set goals.

When your child discovers an interest or a passion in life, teach him how to set broad goals and smaller goals as a means to achieving the larger goal. Talk with your child about setbacks, and the importance of persistence in any endeavor. Some children will give up on goals prematurely due to anxiety about failure. Teach the anxious child that failure is an inevitable part of the journey. Children who can identify what they want, set goals, and persist despite setbacks are well on the way to independence.

Cindy Jett, LICSW is a psychotherapist and author of Harry the Happy Caterpillar Grows, an acclaimed picture book that helps the anxious child face his fears and helps children adapt to change.

If someone were to talk about people who live in conditions of poverty, you might expect them to be talking about people who live in developing countries or in a location where a natural disaster has recently occurred. Would you be surprised to learn that over 14 million American children live below the poverty level today? Most people in this country would be shocked to hear that number. Do we simply look at the forest of reasonably well-off people in America and forget to look at the individual trees?

Especially during the past few years of economic downturn, the problem of children in poverty is becoming a topic of which more and more people are becoming aware. There are many reasons for poverty, but with many jobs being lost and homes being foreclosed on recently, more and more people are unable to meet the high cost of living. The children are the innocent victims of circumstances beyond the control of their families. If there is not enough money, the children are undernourished, have limited educational opportunities, and minimal health care. This means that they are growing up without the advantages that most Americans take for granted.

Once you are aware of the magnitude of this problem, you will probably ask yourself what you can do to help. It may seem overwhelming and like nothing you can do could possibly make a dent. However, the little you are able to do could help one child receive needed medical care or nutritional supplies. It will make a difference to that one child. If you tell someone else about the problem and let them know that you are helping and ask them to help as well, it will make the difference to another child. One by one, the children can be helped out of this terrible situation.

Once you have decided that you can make a difference, you may wish to know how to go about finding ways to help. Many Church and Civic groups work with children who are living below the poverty level. They love to have volunteers and donations and can get you started on a path to empowering the children. There are also many other charitable organizations who have studied this problem and know how to put the least amount of money to the best use, so you know that every dollar counts. You can search online for charitable organizations dedicated to feeding America’s hungry children and make donations through them. No matter how you are able to help, don’t let another day go by without doing something for a hungry child.

The American Relief Foundation invites you to help us provide poor children around the US with support they need. We are looking for a Suffolk County Car Donation to help our cause. If you have an unwanted car consider a charity car donations.

With bullying such a common problem in today’s society parents can’t afford to ignore this issue. Here are 10 quick tips for parents to be proactive about bullying. These ideas will help children feel better about themselves and consider the feelings of others – useful strategies for children whether they are being bullied or are doing the bullying.

1. Respect your child’s positive qualities and tell them what they are to boost their self-esteem. The better children feel about themselves the more bully proof they are and the less likely they are to bully others.

2. Model respectful behavior yourself – our children copy what we do. E.g. How do you react if someone cuts you off in traffic and your children are in the car?

3. Listen to your children with empathy so they grow to show it for others. Saying things like “That must have been very scary for you” helps your children, because their feelings are being acknowledged and they truly feel heard.

4. Encourage your child’s social and emotional intelligence by talking about feelings and how other people feel. Questions like: “What do you think it was like for the others when that happened?” help children to see things from outside of their egocentric point of view.

5. Talk to your children about aggressive, submissive and assertive behavior so they understand about power in relationships.

6. Notice when your children are behaving well and tell them! Focusing on positive behavior is such a simple way to get more of it as well as boosting your children’s self-esteem!

7. Give your children opportunities to share their ideas about fighting and bullying and what might work to stop it. Ask questions like: “If … happened, what could you do to keep yourself safe?” to allow children to work out what they could do by themselves.

8. Teach them some concrete strategies to try as well. E.g. instead of focusing on the bullying imagine the bully swelling up and popping. Strategies like this which help a child stay calm can be very helpful. When children learn to be aware of their reactions and the part this plays in being bullied, they can choose to react differently.

9. Stay up to date with your child’s school’s bullying policy and about bullying in general. What do you know about bullying and technology? Find out more about cyberbullying so you are informed.

10. Support your children in solving their own fights or bullying issues rather than stepping in and doing it for them. Remember your response as a parent models a powerful message for your children.

Two coaching questions that are helpful around bullying are:

1. How do I show respect to my children?
2. Am I supporting them to solve their own problems?

If you ask yourselves coaching questions such as these everyday you will be building a close and loving relationship with your children as well as supporting them to deal with bullying and other challenges to the best of their capabilities. After all, isn’t this what children need as they grow towards independence?

Barbara Beccari M.Ed and parent-coach, is co-author of a beautiful children’s picture book about respectful relationships. Barbara is co-founder of parentSCOPE, a parent-coaching business acknowledged for its innovation. parentSCOPE supports parents to have loving and close relationships with their children, from babies to teens. Check out to find out more.

Practicing kindness generates good feeling, a broader understanding of the world, and fosters happiness in both the giver and receiver. Most people would agree that it is an important virtue to teach our children. Here are some strategies to encourage kindness in children.

Teach empathy.

The bedrock of kindness is empathy, the ability to put oneself in someone elses shoes and feel compassion for their experience. Help children adapt to different kinds of people and encourage them to look below the surface. Why is that little boy so quiet? Is he shy? Afraid? Why might a friend seem sad? Is there something your child can do to help them feel better? Ask your child what helps him when he experiences similar feelings, and encourage him to try out different ways of being there for others.

Teach manners.

Help your child understand that manners arent simply conventions; they are ways of showing respect for and honoring other people. A rule, such as not interrupting others, is way of valuing what someone has to say. Saying thank you is a way of showing gratitude and acknowledging someone elses effort.

Be kind to your kids.

Show your children that you love them, respect them and value their feelings. Practice good manners with them. Never berate your children or call them names.

Set limits with your kids.

Being kind doesnt mean that you are always nice. Children need limits and to need to respect your authority. They will need to be told when they are out of line and punished accordingly. Limits are about teaching your child how to be in the world and to treat others with respect. In many ways, setting limits is a way of teaching children the standards of respectful and kind behavior.

Reinforce acts of kindness in children.

If your daughter brings you a bouquet of flowers, show your joy. If you see your son sharing his favorite game with a friend, acknowledge it. Encourage children to give cards when people are sick or to thank them for gifts.

Encourage children to be kind to the world at large.

Reach out in your community in some way. Perhaps you can volunteer at a local soup kitchen, visit the sick or the elderly, or walk the dogs at the local animal shelter. Often, giving back to the world can be a family practice.

Model kindness.

Treat others with respect, demonstrate thoughtfulness, volunteer, and practice empathy. Children are more likely to internalize what you do, than what you say to do.

Cindy Jett, LICSW is a psychotherapist and author of Harry the Happy Caterpillar Grows, an acclaimed picture book that helps the anxious child face his fears and helps children adapt to change.

If your kid has trouble playing with a group of one or more other friends, then take a look at these team building skills-they’ll help him relate to others in no time! In this article you will learn the advantages of three unique strategies and benefits of team-building for kids. The first step in great team building is that the activity must be well-thought out.

The best way to teach your child what you mean is to start with, “I have a question for you. Ask it. Listen to your child. Later ask him how he felt when you saw things from his point of view. Tell him to share this friendly technique with other kids.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that because he doesn’t talk yet he won’t understand. In fact he is beginning to associate particular sounds with actions and objects (Nouns and verbs being the easiest vocabulary to eventually introduce to your child.)

Parents often looked very disbelieving when, having asked how best they can help their child at home, are told simply to take time to read to them making it an enjoyable experience.

OK, here they are. Each tip will beckon you to create a simple action plan to work on. And keep coming back to this list to check on your progress. Please be patient with yourself ans you devote 2 minutes a day, using your personal planner to jot down thoughts on how to grow in each of these areas.

How does all this relate to the thrifty parent? If money is tight, can you really afford to give your child an allowance? Maybe the bigger question is, can you really afford not to? An allowance can teach children the importance of budgeting, and may save you a lot of money in the long run. Do you feel like a bottomless money pit, shelling out money left and right because your kids always “need” something? Giving kids an allowance can save money if you adhere to the idea that once the money is gone, it’s gone.

Listen and sing along together:

Singing with your kids is a fun way to get together. Play drums together or any instrument you know or your kids want to learn. Get the piano out or play the guitar.

Read together:

Reading a book together is another option you could take. Read to them aloud. This encourages your kids to ask different questions. It also helps their imagination to be creative.

Raising children isn’t easy. When your child’s playmate leads him into trouble, it makes parenting more difficult. Sometimes you’ll have to stick your neck out and ask for help from teachers, clergy, and other parents. When you respectfully ask for help, you’re likely to find the needed solution.

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