Posts Tagged ‘Club’

Club Head Speed Differs – If you can imagine the club head speed generated by Tiger Woods when he is giving everything he has to a driver, then you can imagine the amount of compression he applies to the ball. If he is hitting a full iron shot into a green, compression will be different. If he hits a three quarter pitch shot, or a delicate pitch, the compression is less and less. The average putt has virtually no compression to speak of.

If I am playing a full iron shot I will set my club face open to the ball to target line. A three quarter shot I shall only slightly open the face and when chipping and putting I will be square to the ball to target line at address. If you stick to these basic positions you will have done all you can to set the club in a position which offers your mind the least amount of manipulation for each shot. The rest is up to your unconscious mind to learn how to send the ball to your desired target in the best possible way. Remember that golf is about setting the machine up in the best possible way, bio-mechanically and technically and then handing the job over to the unconscious mind to use that machine “setup” in order to fulfil the task you have asked it to do.

The better you “setup” the easier it is for your unconscious mind to complete the task. Golf is 90% mental and the other 10% is mechanical controlled by the mind, therefore Golf is 100% mental. However, you make the job your mind has to do easier or harder depending how you set the machine before the swing is made. The least number of working parts or manipulation needed, the better.

Additional causes of compression variation – Club Head Speed – Varies according not only to the shot you require – a full shot versus a half swing – but also depending on the individual and their ability to create club head speed.

Juniors, some beginners, some ladies and some senior players may generate very little club head speed in which case they will apply very little compression to the ball. The degree to which their club head is set open at address will be very slight.

Compression (and therefore spin rates) of golf balls differ. Hard 1 piece balls are at one end of the spectrum and soft 3 piece balls at the other end. Not only this but 3 piece balls do not all have the same compression rating. You can check with the ball manufacturer as to the compression rating of the ball you are using. Finding a ball that best suits your play and then sticking to this ball will help improve your ability to consistently square the club face at the point of separation, and your ability to judge the distances you hit the ball with all your shots, putting included.

The golf ball is greatly overlooked by the average amateur as a factor contributing to better play. Spin rates and compression ratings should be taken into account when choosing the correct ball for you. Talk to your coach and discuss what ball is best suited you your current abilities to maximise what the ball can offer to your game.

Next – Article 10 In Series – Your Golf Equipment

You can get a copy of Homer Kelly’s Golfing Machine on the books page of our website. Reviews of Golf Training Programs are now available on the website so you can read up on a system before deciding whether it will be a help to your game. Some of the systems are really good and will give you great results if you work them, but some of the systems which promise to knock loads of shots off your game are, quite frankly, pretty rubbish. Read my reviews at http://www.golfmindshop.com

For best viewing experience, please download the following .pdf files of the studies discussed in Dr. Cmar’s talk:
http://files.ncas.org/2014-12-02/NCAS-mefloquine-HIV-plos-2014.pdf
http://files.ncas.org/2014-12-02/NCAS-homeopathy-PMS-2014.pdf

One of the most important aspects of being a healthy skeptic is knowing that just because a scientific study was done on a topic does not mean the study was done well, or that the conclusion the authors reach is supported by what they actually did. But when someone states that a particular study has major flaws or was well-done, what precisely does that mean?

In this video, Dr. John Cmar analyzes two different journal articles in detail, focusing on the good, the bad, and the ugly of how studies are done and interpreted.

John Cmar, MD, has been long enthralled with horrible infections that could spell doom for humankind, as well as sanity and skepticism in the practice of medicine. He is currently an Instructor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Assistant Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. He is the lead physician in Sinai’s Ryan White initiative, which provides medical care and social assistance to patients with HIV infection who are without medical insurance.

In his role as Program Director for the Internal Medicine residency program at Sinai, he teaches an annual course series in Evidence-Based Medicine, among many other duties.
He also does Infectious Diseases outreach in Baltimore television and print media, and is the guest-in-residence on the monthly Midday on Health show with Dan Rodricks on 88.1 WYPR radio in Baltimore. John is a science fiction and fantasy fan, avid gamer, and podcast enthusiast. He currently blogs and podcasts on skeptical, medical, and geeky topics as Saint Nickanuck of the Tundra at johncmar.com
Video Rating: / 5