Posts Tagged ‘Constitution’

Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center in conversation with Walter Isaacson of the Aspen Institute.
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While the substance of constitutional rights is always important, it is often the procedures surrounding the protection and enforcement of those rights that give them teeth – or defang them. From the landmark case of New York Times v. Sullivan to the recently decided Susan B. Anthony List v. Driehaus, the procedures required before one can burden speech, or raise a successful defense under the First Amendment, are critical to the effective scope of the constitutional right. This panel will explore the various procedural safeguards applied – or not applied – in the context of the Freedom of Speech. What level of proof is required before speech may be restricted based on an otherwise valid interest? When will a private party have standing to challenge a restriction on speech that may not yet be final but that has immediate adverse consequences, such as requiring a party to defend an investigation or rebut a preliminary government finding in the midst of an election campaign? What safeguards should exist in administrative processes, such as IRS tax exemption rulings, where discretion may be used to punish speech or otherwise favor one viewpoint over another? These and other examples all illustrate that even where the substance of First Amendment rights is well established, procedural loopholes or protections can reduce or enhance the effectiveness of those rights.

The Federalist Society’s Free Speech & Election Law Practice Group presented this panel on “How First Amendment Procedures Protect First Amendment Substance” on Friday, November 14, during the 2014 National Lawyers Convention.

–Prof. Aaron H. Caplan, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles
–Prof. Robert A. Destro, The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law
–Mr. Todd P. Graves, Graves Garrett LLC
–Prof. Alan B. Morrison, Lerner Family Associate Dean for Public Interest and Public Service Law; Professorial Lecturer in Law, The George Washington University Law School
–Prof. Eugene Volokh, Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law, University of California, Los Angeles School of Law
–Moderator: Hon. David R. Stras, Associate Justice, Minnesota Supreme Court
–Introduction: Mr. Erik S. Jaffe, Sole Practitioner, Erik S. Jaffe, PC; and Chairman, Free Speech & Election Law Practice Group

Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC
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You might’ve heard “there’s no right to gay marriage in the Constitution,” or that marriage equality is something brand new that’s only just been invented. And it’s true that I don’t see the words “gay marriage” in the Constitution. But I also don’t see “straight marriage,” either — or any marriage at all. So, does the Constitution protect marriage or not?
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A majority of religious Americans say they support marriage equality according to new numbers by the Public Religion Research Institute — a sign that more people of faith are reconciling their beliefs and improving their understanding of LGBT people and families…

Read More At:
http://mic.com/articles/116354/you-ll-never-guess-how-much-religious-support-same-sex-marriage-has-now?utm_source=policymicTWTR&utm_medium=main&utm_campaign=social

Clip from the Friday, April 24th 2015 edition of The Kyle Kulinski Show, which airs live on Blog Talk Radio and Secular Talk Radio monday – friday 4-6pm Eastern.

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Here you may watch and listen recorded lectures of Raja Muhammad Shahbaz Khan regarding Islamic studies, Pakistan studies, and Urdu.

PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy

The video is a quick overview of the sections or Articles of the US Constitution. Students will learn about Article I and it’s establishing the powers and structure of the US Legislative Branch known as Congress. Article II establishes and outlines the Executive Branch headed up by the President of the United States. Article III established the Judicial Branch headed by the US Supreme Court. Article IV discusses the relationship between the Federal Government and state governments known as federalism. Article V establishes how to create amendments to the Constitution. Article VI is known as the “Supremacy Clause” which establishes that federal law is more powerful than state law. Article VII outlines the way the US Constitution was ratified.

Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams.

As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class.

***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***

The Constitution   Article 3

This lesson is part of a series of lessons on the Constitution, this lesson will discuss Article 3 which focuses on the Judiciary Branch that establishes the court system, with the highest court being the Supreme Court of the federal court system. The founding fathers made the first articles of the constitution were establishing the most important aspects, Article 1 created the legislature, which makes the laws, Article 2 created the executive branch that enforces the laws and article 3 creates the Judicial branch that interprets the laws. For more lessons please visit www.Videoclass.com
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Article II (Two) of the U.S. Constitution

Jeffrey Rosen of the National Constitution Center in conversation with Walter Isaacson of the Aspen Institute.

The Articles of Confederation - The Constitution Before the Constitution

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For four hot, humid July days, 56 delegates of the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia with one purpose – to ratify the Declaration of Independence. The document, originally drafted by Thomas Jefferson with the help of Ben Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, ad Robert Livingston, declared that the thirteen American colonies were now independent and free of the tyranny of the British Empire. On July 4th, with the final wording in place, it was ready for the whole world to read; though, it would be about another month before congress would actually sign it, contrary to popular belief.

Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/12/articles-confederation-constitution-constitution/

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation
http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/articles.html
http://history.state.gov/milestones/1776-1783/Articles
http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/artconf.asp
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Revolutionary_War
http://books.google.com/books?id=pFXLAMC1xtUC&q=127#v=snippet&q=127&f=false
http://www.cliffsnotes.com/more-subjects/american-government/the-constitution/the-articles-of-confederation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shays%27_Rebellion
Shays’ Rebellion and the Articles of Confederation
http://huntingtonhomestead.org/birthdate.html
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The Constitution Of The United States (Article 1)

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http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/ – A selected lecture from “Introduction to Key Constitutional Concepts and Supreme Court Cases” with University of Pennsylvania law professor Kermit Roosevelt III. For more civics education resources, go to AnnenbergClassroom.org
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Discussing the “reinterpretation” of Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution. This “reinterpretation” effectively allows Japan to exercise the right to collective self-defense (i.e. militarily aid it’s allies if they’re attacked). After WWII, Japan renounced war as a means to settle international disputes, however, that does not prohibit Japan from having self-defense forces. The deployment of Japanese forces overseas (in support roles) is usually a rather controversial topic.

Article 9 protest march in Japan

First time I ever saw a protest march in my towns ;this against the new change in Jaapan saying they can go to war