Posts Tagged ‘Countries’

Hasan A. Yahya , a writer from Palestine

In this article we describe the situation in research, science  and technology. Arab countries have some of the lowest levels of research funding in the world. R&D [research and development] expenditure as a percentage of GDP was a mere 0.4 for the Arab world in 1996, compared to 1.26 in 1995 for Cuba, 2.35 in 1994 for Israel, and 2.9 for Japan.

Science and technology output is quantifiable and measurable in terms of the number of scientific papers per unit of population. The average output of the Arab world per million inhabitants is roughly 2 per cent of that of an industrialized country. While Arab scientific output more than doubled from 11 papers per million in 1985 to 26 papers per million in 1995, China’s output increased eleven-fold from one paper per million inhabitants in 1981 to 11 papers per million in 1995. The Republic of Korea increased its output from 6 to 144 papers per million inhabitants over the same period. India’s output, by contrast, barely changed over the period 1981-1995: its output increased from 17 publications per million inhabitants in 1981 to 19 per million in 1995.

In 1981, China was producing half the output of the Arab world; by 1987, its output had equaled that of Arab countries; it now produces double their output. In 1981, the Republic of Korea was producing 10 percent of the output of the Arab world; in 1995, it almost equaled its output. On a per capita basis, the output of the Arab world is within the range of the top R&D-producing group in the developing world: Brazil, China, and India.

Technological development is rather weak in the Arab countries. This is evidenced by the relative position of Arab countries on the UNDP technology achievement index (TAI), which referred to the late 1990s. The TAI could be calculated for only five Arab countries: Algeria, Egypt, Sudan, Syria, and Tunisia—another indication of the poverty of data on knowledge acquisition in Arab countries.

None of these were classified as “leaders,” a category that included countries such as Israel and the Republic of Korea. Sudan was classified as “marginalized,” while the other four Arab countries were classified as “dynamic adopters,” in the same category as Brazil.

In spite of significant internal variability and compared to leaders in the world, Arab countries in general clearly lag behind in technology creation (measured by patents granted to residents) and diffusion of recent innovations (measured by the share of high- and medium-technology exports in total goods exports). On the other hand, Arab countries fared relatively better on diffusion of old innovations (measured by telephone lines relative to population).

Benefiting from research and technological output depends critically on a robust system of national and international linkages among practitioners. Brazil, China, and the Republic of Korea have established system linkages and policies in order to benefit from their national knowledge base. They have adopted technology policies that have enabled them to sustain a high rate of growth combined with a high rate of technology acquisition.

By contrast, the connectivity of Arab scientists within the Arab world is poor at the national and regional levels. The connectivity of individual Arab scientists with international science is better simply because international relations in science provide the means for cooperation. Many of the significant technology-rich industries in the Arab world have been parachuted in as “black boxes” via international consulting and engineering development organizations (CEDOs). However, these installations are not linked to local or regional CEDOs and R&D organizations. Until such connectivity is established, such installations cannot contribute to the scientific and technological development of the Arab world.

During the past 30 years, there has been a massive transformation of industrial firms in OECD countries; outsourcing and subcontracting have contributed to breaking down the vertically integrated firm. Integration has instead taken the form of joining a global web of technological expertise; meanwhile, out-sourcing has promoted the transfer of technology to Asian and Latin American subcontractors along with the transfer of employment from high-cost to low-cost countries. A number of Asian countries in particular have successfully secured a considerable share of subcontracting from major transnational corporations. This contributed to the formation of the celebrated Asian Tigers and others, such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. Few Arab countries have benefited from the globalization of outsourcing. (736 words) www.askdryahya.com

Resources:

– Khaled al-Maeena, “A Report which Should Open Arab Eyes,” Arab News, July 5, 2002.

– Rima Khalaf Hunaidi, quoted in a U.N. press release, “U.N. Human Development Report Finds Arab Countries Lagging Behind,” July 3, 2002.

– http://www.escwa.org.lb/information/press/un/2002/july/3.html.

– Sal-ama A. Salama, “Facing Up to Unpleasant Facts,” Al-Ahram Weekly, July 11-17, 2002.

– Thomas L. Friedman, “Arabs at the Crossroads,” The New York Times, July 3, 2002.

– Robert Fisk, “UN Highlights Uncomfortable Truths for Arab World,” The Independent, July 3, 2002.

– Victor Davis Hanson, “A Ray of Arab Candor,” City Journal (Online), July 3, 2002, at http://www.city-journal.org/html/eon_7_3_02vdh.html.

– Al-Jazeerah English

– BBC Arabic Reports

Professor, Dr. Hasan A. Yahya is an Arab American writer, scholar, and professor of Sociology lives in the United States of America,  originally from Palestine. He graduated from Michigan State University with  2 Ph.d degrees. He published 55 books plus (40 Arabic and 15 English), and 250 plus articles on sociology, religion, psychology, politics, poetry, and short stories. Philosophically, his writings concern logic, justice and human rights worldwide. Dr. Yahya is the author of Crescentologism: The Moon Theory,  and  Islam Finds its Way, on Amazon. He’s an expert on Race Relations, Arab and Islamic cultures, he is also, interested in religion, world affairs and  global strategic planning for justice and human rights. www.dryahyatv.com

Which Countries Allow Same-Sex Marriage?

Is It Legal To Discriminate Against LGBT? http://testu.be/1JDjK1e
Subscribe! http://bitly.com/1iLOHml

Gay rights, including marriage, have become increasingly relevant with countries stepping up to legalize same-sex marriage. So where is same-sex marriage legal?

Learn More:
37 States with Legal Gay Marriage and 13 States with Same-Sex Marriage Bans
http://gaymarriage.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=004857

Gay Marriage Around the World
http://www.pewforum.org/2013/12/19/gay-marriage-around-the-world-2013/
“A growing number of governments around the world are considering whether to grant legal recognition to same-sex marriages.”

Frequently Asked Questions: Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)
http://www.glaad.org/marriage/doma
“Section 3 of the so-called “Defense of Marriage Act” has been declared unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court.”

Iceland Picks the World’s First Openly Gay PM
http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1875032,00.html
“When Barack Obama was sworn in as the new U.S. President last week, Americans made much of the fact that he was the country’s first black Commander in Chief. ”

Watch More:
Is It Legal To Discriminate Against LGBT?

Subscribe to TestTube Daily!
http://bitly.com/1iLOHml

_________________________

TestTube’s new daily show is committed to answering the smart, inquisitive questions we have about life, society, politics and anything else happening in the news. It’s a place where curiosity rules and together we’ll get a clearer understanding of this crazy world we live in.

Watch more TestTube: http://testtube.com/testtubedailyshow/

Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=testtubenetwork

TestTube on Twitter https://twitter.com/TestTube

Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/TraceDominguez

TestTube on Facebook https://facebook.com/testtubenetwork

TestTube on Google+ http://gplus.to/TestTube

Download the New TestTube iOS app! http://testu.be/1ndmmMq

A Chinese court ruled against a gay couple in the country’s first same-sex marriage lawsuit, dealing a blow to the campaign for LGBT equality. CNN’s Matt Rivers reports.
Video Rating: / 5

Shouldn’t These Countries Do Something For Their People?
Subscribe to our channel: http://goo.gl/9CwQhg

Description:
Running a country is no easy task, and it’s a job that not very many people want. When it comes to running a country, there are budgets that are dedicated to improving the wellbeing of citizens. This includes budgeting money for the education system, healthcare, unemployment, and services to the needy. Also, when a company makes a large amount of money, then ideally, they should be able to give their employees a wage that is high enough for them to be able to support their families. At least, that how it is in a perfect world. Unfortunately, some of the richest countries in the world have the highest rates of poverty. Why is that? To put it bluntly, it’s due to government corruption. It is due from the money that goes straight into the pockets of government leaders instead of going to the people.
In countries that are wealthy and have a big economic demand, like oil, it is surprising that there aren’t many jobs available to the working class. And then the jobs that are available, they pay so little that clawing your way out of poverty is nearly impossible since you can’t afford a place to live. Countries like Sudan and Iraq have oil profits that dive into the billions, and yet their poverty rate affects more than a quarter of their countries population. The saddest part is that the citizens of these countries are very well aware of what is going on in their government.
The countries that are included in this video are also known to be exceptionally corrupt. Instead of using the profits for the improvement of their country, big company owners and government leaders have instead chosen to pocket the money that comes into the country instead. By passing proposals that will increase salaries and budgets for the improvement of the big wigs’ lives, they are neglecting the people who need the money the most. Even if you’re not looking at this from the perception of improving the lives of people, take a look at the conditions of these countries. Roads aren’t paved, buildings are falling apart, the basic necessities still include using a hole for a bathroom, and more.
So what will it take to shake up the corruption and balance out the wealth coming into these countries like Brazil, Venezuela, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, India, and Kazakhstan? Will it take a rebellion? A war? At this point, it is uncertain. But, just as Rome wasn’t built in a day, perhaps these countries, even though they are older than the countries of Canada and the United States, are still on their way to figuring out their policies. But that is likely just wishful thinking. The reason why the corruption still continues is because these countries aren’t held accountable for their actions. Sure, there’s the United Nations, but there’s only so much they can do.
For details on how much money each country brings in, versus the percentage of poverty in their population, check out the video. You may need to sit down for this, if you’re not already.

Our Social Media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRichest.org
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com
Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest
—————————————————————————————–
Featuring:
Sudan
Iraq
Kazakhstan
Venezuela
Nigeria
Saudi Arabia
India
Brazil
—————————————————————————————–
For more videos and articles visit:
http://www.therichest.com/

Hasan A. Yahya, a professor of Educational Administration

The Arab countries were approached for research on various topics in the last half century, for increasing global importance and national independence. In other words, the Arab world was ignored for a long time while it was a part of the Ottoman Empire. After the WWI and WWII, the position of the Arab countries became more important in the world stage, especially with the promotion and contracts of Oil agreements. Such a product divided the Arab countries into two sharp division, one division is labor rich countries, and the other is oil-rich countries.

All people, regardless of age or gender deserve a good public education. There are no exceptions to this rule (assuming normality) and any attempt to make excuses is unacceptable. Arab countries, however, are accused of tradition against education especially the female, which is untrue. Unfortunately, reporters and rush researchers were interested in certain strange quotes with no elaboration. They focus on certain problems, which may lead readers toa gloomy picture. However, there were always bright success stories in many of these countries. I will cover some successful stories in the coming articles.

Some articles may be correct in many aspects, others may be misleading to generalize issues and to say there is a problem with female education in the entire Arab world. Therefore, Arabs are misunderstood when it comes to reporting from outside, for example, on education, we may read this statement about Arab (Muslim) parents quoted : “When we asked parents why they did not allow their girls to school, they would say “because it’s wrong, it’s irreligious – they should stay home.”

This implies uneducated studies, where an interviewer took this out of context. Another topic  is female circumcision which is partly found in some Arab countries. In fact, Islam encourages education for females as well as males. And more than 90%  of Arab countries do not practice female circumcision. Many of these countries issued laws forbidding that cultural habit in some districts.  Those who release such phrases are unfamiliar with Islam themselves. On the contrary, it is unreligious to keep females from being educated. As long as it is within a decent environment, education is highly encouraged. Unfortunately, the Western media emphasizes undermining the Muslim world, forgetting the great Muslim and Arab history.

The other issue is the quote in some reports “Literacy rates of women in the Arab world, according to the latest report of UNDP, are around 55 percent.” Forgetting what are the literacy rates of men in the Arab world? To compare education enrollment would be better to compare the literacy rates between genders to present a more accurate picture of the problems involving education in the Arab world. In many studies on education in the  Middle East, we are aware of issues involving equality for women in the Arab world and Middle East and believe there are obstacles to overcome, other issues may be needed to be included in such studies, to be explored more that are relevant to the lack of education in the Arab world – such as sociological issues concerning independence, development, and  poverty in some countries. (537 words) www.askdryahya.com

 

Resources:

– Khaled al-Maeena, “A Report which Should Open Arab Eyes,” Arab News, July 5, 2002.

– Rima Khalaf Hunaidi, quoted in a U.N. press release, “U.N. Human Development Report Finds Arab Countries Lagging Behind,” July 3, 2002.

– http://www.escwa.org.lb/information/press/un/2002/july/3.html.

– Sal-ama A. Salama, “Facing Up to Unpleasant Facts,” Al-Ahram Weekly, July 11-17, 2002.

– Thomas L. Friedman, “Arabs at the Crossroads,” The New York Times, July 3, 2002.

– Robert Fisk, “UN Highlights Uncomfortable Truths for Arab World,” The Independent, July 3, 2002.

– Victor Davis Hanson, “A Ray of Arab Candor,” City Journal (Online), July 3, 2002, at http://www.city-journal.org/html/eon_7_3_02vdh.html.

– Al-Jazeerah English

– BBC Arabic Reports

Professor, Dr. Hasan A. Yahya is an Arab American writer, scholar, and professor of Sociology and Educational Administration lives in the United States of America,  originally from Palestine. He graduated from Michigan State University with  2 Ph.d degrees. He published 58 books plus (43 Arabic and 15 English), and 250 plus articles on sociology, religion, psychology, politics, poetry, and short stories. Philosophically, his writings concern logic, justice and human rights worldwide. Dr. Yahya is the author of Crescentologism: The Moon Theory,  and  Islam Finds its Way, on Amazon. He’s an expert on Race Relations, Arab and Islamic cultures, he is also, interested in religion, world affairs and  global strategic planning for justice and human rights. www.dryahyatv.com

Thursday’s successful Brexit vote holds great consequences for economies worldwide, with some analysts warning that departure from the EU could plunge Britain back into a recession that might in turn spread to other countries. For more on the financial implications of Brexit, Hari Sreenivasan talks to David Wessel of the Brookings Institution and Diane Swonk of DS Economics.

Video Rating: / 5

http://sixtyandme.com/6-fabulous-countries-that-love-older-women | Now that you’re over sixty, you’ve probably traveled to many wonderful places around the world, alone or with family and friends. Perhaps you chose places for the children, or followed your cultural and heart connections. Now you find yourself an older woman with a slightly different set of criteria. You want to be safe, demand good value and have a desire to explore new and unique places for the independent individual you have become. I for one don’t particularly want to see Disneyland ever again — but that’s just me! So it’s time to see the places you’ve always dreamed about! It is your time! You know what you want. The question is what country will best support your wanderlust!

There are plenty of places that older women will love. Here are just a few ideas:

Visit Mellow Vietnam
Cruise Across Canada
Explore Down Under – Australia and New Zealand
Make Friends in Ireland
Experience the Rainforest in Costa Rica
Go Biking in the Netherlands

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/sixtyandme?sub_confirmation=1.

CONNECT WITH SIXTY AND ME:
* Website: http://sixtyandme.com
* Forums: http://sixtyandme.com/forums
* Facebook: http://facebook.com/sixtyandme
* Twitter: http://twitter.com/sixtyandme
* Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/sixtyandme
* Newsletter: http://bit.ly/sixtyandmenewsletter
Video Rating: / 5