Posts Tagged ‘Course’

So we’ve talked a lot in this series about how computers fetch and display data, but how do they make decisions on this data? From spam filters and self-driving cars, to cutting edge medical diagnosis and real-time language translation, there has been an increasing need for our computers to learn from data and apply that knowledge to make predictions and decisions. This is the heart of machine learning which sits inside the more ambitious goal of artificial intelligence. We may be a long way from self-aware computers that think just like us, but with advancements in deep learning and artificial neural networks our computers are becoming more powerful than ever.

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Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances: Crash Course Government and Politics #3

In which Craig Benzine teaches you about the US Governments Separation of powers and the system of checks and balances. In theory, the Legislative Branch, the Executive Branch, and the Judicial Brach are designed to keep each other in check, and to keep any branch from becoming too powerful. In reality, the system was designed to keep the president from becoming some kind of autocrat. For the most part, it has worked. Craig will call in the clones to explain which powers belong to which branches, and to reveal some secret perks that the Supreme Court justices enjoy.

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Do you want to seek revenge? Science says revenge might not be so sweet. Watch this video to find out more.

ScienceofPeople.com for the full article.
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to keep up with everything we’re doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content.

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Why do people sometimes do bad things just because someone else told them to? And what does the term Groupthink mean? In today’s episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank talks about the ideas of Social Influence and how it can affect our decisions to act or to not act.

If you are currently in need of help: http://www.mentalhealth.gov/get-help/


Table of Contents:

Milgram Experiment 0:31
Automatic Mimicry 3:29
Solomon Asch 4:08
Normative Social Influence 5:31
Social Facilitation 5:59
Social Loafing 6:19
Deindividuation, Group Polarization, & Groupthink 6:50


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So today, Craig is finally going to start talking about politics. Now up until this point we’ve specifically been looking at government – that is answering the questions of who, what, and how in relation to policies. But politics is different in that it looks at why certain policies are made. We’re going to start today by looking at public opinion – specifically how the public does (and does not) influence our elected officials.

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10 Things to Know About Unit 8

Any savvy high school student has known that he or she should take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses if he or she wants to be a competitive applicant to top universities. College admissions are definitely getting more and more competitive, but high school students are getting more and more strategic, even the ones who can’t afford to go to the elite prep schools that are essentially breeding grounds for the Ivy League.

And while it’s certainly in the student’s interest to take as many Honors, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses as he or she can, it’s also important to be reasonable. It’s unlikely that any student can handle a full course load of AP courses, especially if he or she wants to participate in the extracurricular activities that admissions committees really like to see (oh and maybe see their friends and have some fun occasionally, too).

Students should think critically about their skill set when choosing which AP courses to take. It’s rare to find someone who excels at every single subject to the degree that that he or she can score a 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement test for that subject. (And it must be really hard to like the people who are.) Students should think about what classes they’ve loved and succeeded in in the past. Does she love to read? Does she recite Othello quotes in her sleep? Then maybe the AP English Language course is a good one to take.

Students should consider both if they will get a strong grade in the course (“B” at the minimum, preferably an “A”) and if they can earn a passing grade on the AP exams. Admissions committees look at the rigor of a student’s course load (how many advanced courses they take, over how many different disciplines), the overall grade point average (top colleges are turning away truckloads of students with un-weighted 4.0 GPAs), and also if the student is taking an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate exams, and what scores the student is earning on those exams.

Admissions committees want to see that students are challenging themselves in their course load, but they also want to see that the students are succeeding in those more challenging courses. This is why it’s not advantageous for a student to just take as many AP or IB courses as his or her school offers, unless he or she is truly certain of earning a high grade in the course. If the student doesn’t know if he or she will earn a passing grade on the AP or IB exam, that’s less of a deciding factor.

Taking the exam and not earning a passing score is not a deal-breaker for most colleges. A passing score is considered icing on the cake, and not-passing score is not a detractor. University admissions departments don’t want to discourage students from attempting the AP Microeconomics test just because they’re not sure if they’ll earn a score of a 2 or 3. Students are rewarded for taking the challenging courseload, as well as the exam, and if they earn a high score, it’s great, but if they don’t, they shouldn’t stress about it, at least as far as getting into college concerned.

Paul Thomson is a writer and frequent online contributor who is passionate about improving college readiness. He frequently writes about the http://www.shmoop.com/ap-english-language/ >AP English language and http://www.shmoop.com/ap-microeconomics/>AP Microeconomics . In his spare time, he loves to promote the joy of reading to youth in his community.

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Why do people do bad things? Is it because of the situation or who they are at their core? In this week’s episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank works to shed a little light on the ideas of Situation vs. Personality. Oh, and we’ll have a look at the Stanford Prison Experiment… It’s alarming.

If you are currently in need of help: http://www.mentalhealth.gov/get-help/


Table of Contents:

Social Psychology 01:29
Fundamental Attribution Error 02:04
Dual-Process Theory of Persuasion 03:18
Foot-In-The-Door Phenomenon 04:35
Stanford Prison Experiment 05:12
Cognitive Dissonance 8:08


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YAY! Thumbs up for more health style videos! 🙂 let’s start off this new year healthy & happy! CLICK HERE FOR MORE HEALTH TIPS! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtHmK2JeNjY

**PS I filmed the voiceover when I was really sick so sorry about my voice hahahaha

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don’t forget that being fit is not a destination it is a way of life. 🙂
and being healthy is NOT just about how you look, it is so much deeper than that. I challenge you to find “your healthy” 🙂
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to keep up with everything we’re doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content.

So, it turns out we have an easy time reading emotions in facial expressions, but emotions can straight up kill us! In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank discusses stress, emotions, and their overall impact on our health.


Table of Contents:

How Emotions Work 00:00
Two-Dimensional Model of Emotional Experience 03:29
How Anger, Happiness, and Depression Affect Health 4:52
Stress, the Nervous System, and Chronic Stress 6:36


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What are air currents? Air currents are like rivers of wind caused by areas of high and low pressure.The air above the land is warmer and less dense, so it rises. The air over the water is cooler and heavier. The cool air rushes in toward the low-pressure zone over the land, forming a lovely sea breeze. But what about Jet Streams? In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina chats with us about all things relating to Air Currents.

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///Standards Used in This Video///
5-ESS2-1. Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact. [Clarification Statement: Examples could include the influence of the ocean on ecosystems, landform shape, and climate; the influence of the atmosphere on landforms and ecosystems through weather and climate; and the influence of mountain ranges on winds and clouds in the atmosphere. The geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere are each a system.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to the interactions of two systems at a time.]

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Credits…
Producer & Editor: Nicholas Jenkins
Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda
Host: Sabrina Cruz
Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern
Writer: Allison Shaw
Executive Producers: John & Hank Green
Consultant: Shelby Alinsky
Script Editor: Blake de Pastino

Thought Cafe Team:
Stephanie Bailis
Cody Brown
Suzanna Brusikiewicz
Jonathan Corbiere
Nick Counter
Kelsey Heinrichs
Jack Kenedy
Corey MacDonald
Tyler Sammy
Nikkie Stinchcombe
James Tuer
Adam Winnik
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Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem services which a healthy biosphere provides.

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Table of Contents
Ecosystem Services 00:51
The Importance of Biodiversity 04:07
Deforestation 06:42
Desertification 06:49
Global Warming 07:59
Invasive Species 08:51
Overharvesting 09:20

Crash Course/SciShow videos referenced in this episode:
Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D7hZpIYlCA
Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leHy-Y_8nRs
Ecological Succession: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZKIHe2LDP8
Climate Change: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Jxs7lR8ZI
Invasive Species: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDOwTXobJ3k
Food Shortage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPLJP84xL9A

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The Art Of Short Article Writing For Nonfiction Writers

Learn The Skills You Need To Get Paid To Write From Home And Enjoy The Process Of Creating High Quality Articles

For over fourteen years, writing coach and platform expert Christina Katz has been teaching writers of all levels how to write publication-quality short nonfiction articles. After taking Christina’s writing classes, students go on to publish their first clips, increase their productivity, and remember why they fell in love with article writing in the first place.

This course covers how to write six popular and saleable nonfiction article forms, as well as how to warm up to write your best articles and how to polish the articles you draft.

Writers who take this course will receive:

40+ minutes of video coaching
98 pages of instructional worksheets
Multiple examples of publication-quality writing
Visual inspiration in the form of images of published articles throughout the course

This class focuses on getting you into print sooner, rather than later, without pulling all-nighters or paying a fortune in babysitter fees. Whether you are a stay-at-home mom, a working dad, or just a busy person, you will learn how to create short, easy-to-write freelance articles—a skill that will make it easier to work your way up to longer, more time-consuming freelance articles (like features, profiles, and even a book) when you are ready.

You will try your pen at tips, fillers, short interviews, list articles, how-tos, short personal essays, and personal experience articles. You will learn to brainstorm ideas, interview experts, integrate quotes and research, understand plagiarism, and rewrite your work until it’s publication-ready. Opportunities for self-reflection and self-assessment are woven into the class so you can productively generate article ideas long after you finish the course.

This writing class is helpful for both beginning writers who have never taken a class before as well as for experienced freelancers looking to get back in the swing of writing. If you have written a book but you need help breaking out fresh content from your specialty topic, this class is also for you. This class is perfect for moms who want to write for regional parenting magazines as well as anyone with an eye on writing for national markets.

Course Directory


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BEAUTIFUL SHORT ARTICLE BY HANIF SAMAANA
Narrated by Khalid Syed
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