Posts Tagged ‘English’

articles art 1 english grammar

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A public lecture offered by Dr David Turner at the University of York on behalf of Lifelong Learning on Tuesday 15 March 2016.
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Learn when and how to use the articles ‘a’ and ‘an’ in this English grammar lesson. We have mentioned so many examples with a gap-filling exercise, so that you can understand everything easily.

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Teach your kids Learn basic English grammar, the articles with examples and the use of it in this kids learning video in the most entertaining and interactive way with the educational animated series only on Quixot Kids Edu.

We have the best collection and series of educational, learn English grammar videos for babies, toddlers and children. Nursery rhymes, kindergarten videos, Good habits for children in English, good manners videos for children, healthy habits for kids, school interview for kids and much more. Go check out our all cool educational videos.

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Articles | English Grammar Lessons For Beginners | English Grammar For Kids

Pebbles present Learn English Speaking, Learn English Grammar, Learn English Conversations for kids, Learn English Grammar Full Course For Children.

Pebbles also offers a variety of other stories such as Grandma Stories, Grandpa Stories for kids, Moral Stories for kids, Animal Stories for Kids, Jungle Stories for kids, Panchatantra Stories for Children, Birbal the Wise, Tenali Raman, Fairy Tales and many more.

The most popular, interesting & ancient stories for babies, nursery kids & children of all age groups by Pebbles Kids Learning Channel.

Learn English Grammar contains the following Videos

Pronouns and Kinds of Pronouns, Tenses, Continuous Tense, Comparison of Adverbs, Conditional Sentences, Phrase and Clause, Determiners, Imperative Sentences

Articles, Sentences, Kinds of Sentences, Nouns, Auxiliary Verbs, Verbs, Phrasal Verbs, Adjectives, Kinds of Adjectives, Conjunctions, Interjections, Prepositions, Gender, Adverbs, Degrees of Comparison, Active Voice Passive Voice, Agreement of Verbs, Connectors, Present Simple Negative Verbs, Reported Speech, Question Words

English Grammar Exercise Videos are as follows

Pronouns, Subject Pronouns, Object Pronouns, Possessive Pronouns, Reflexive Pronouns, Reciprocal Pronouns, Indefinite Pronouns, Simple Present Tense, Simple Past Tense, Simple Past Tense Regular Verbs, Simple Past Tense Irregular Verbs, Simple Past Form, Future Different, Simple Present Form, Present Continuous Tense, Present Continuous Form, Past Continuous Tense, Adverbs and Adverbials of Frequency, Adverbs and Adverbials of Duration, Adverbs and Adverbials of Degree, Can Modals for Indicating Ability, Can or May Modals for Indicating Permission, May or May Not, Modals Expressing Intentions and Unwillingness, Modals Giving Orders, Habits in Past Using Modals, Habits in Past Using Used To, Can or Can’t, Zero Conditional, First Conditional, Second Conditional, Third Conditional, Clauses of Purpose, Clauses of Cause and Effect, Clauses of Contrast, Relative Clauses, Phrases and Sentences, Demonstrative Determiners, Quantifying Determiners, Verb Agreement with Quantifying Determiners, Imperative Form, Past Regrets Wish, Past Regrets If Only, Will or Won’t

Use the Appropriate Articles, Subjects, Predicate, Simple Sentences, Imperative Form, Correct Form of Noun, Countable and Uncountable Nouns, Compound Nouns, Collective Nouns, Abstract Nouns, Verbs, Verbs Am Is Are, Verbs Do Does Did, Was or Were, Phrasal Verbs, Find the Adjectives, Adjectives of Quality and Quantity, Adjectives of Size and Color, Comparative Adjectives, Adjectives of Interrogation, Conjunctions, Interjection, Prepositions, Preposition of Time, Preposition of Place, Masculine Nouns Feminine Nouns, Feminine Form of Masculine Nouns, Adverbs, Adverbs of Time, Adverbs of Place, Adverbs of Frequency, Superlative Forms, Comparatives, Active Voice, Subject Verb Agreement, Noun Verb Agreement, Connectors, Present Simple Negative Verbs, Reported Speech, Question Words

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Any savvy high school student has known that he or she should take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses if he or she wants to be a competitive applicant to top universities. College admissions are definitely getting more and more competitive, but high school students are getting more and more strategic, even the ones who can’t afford to go to the elite prep schools that are essentially breeding grounds for the Ivy League.

And while it’s certainly in the student’s interest to take as many Honors, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses as he or she can, it’s also important to be reasonable. It’s unlikely that any student can handle a full course load of AP courses, especially if he or she wants to participate in the extracurricular activities that admissions committees really like to see (oh and maybe see their friends and have some fun occasionally, too).

Students should think critically about their skill set when choosing which AP courses to take. It’s rare to find someone who excels at every single subject to the degree that that he or she can score a 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement test for that subject. (And it must be really hard to like the people who are.) Students should think about what classes they’ve loved and succeeded in in the past. Does she love to read? Does she recite Othello quotes in her sleep? Then maybe the AP English Language course is a good one to take.

Students should consider both if they will get a strong grade in the course (“B” at the minimum, preferably an “A”) and if they can earn a passing grade on the AP exams. Admissions committees look at the rigor of a student’s course load (how many advanced courses they take, over how many different disciplines), the overall grade point average (top colleges are turning away truckloads of students with un-weighted 4.0 GPAs), and also if the student is taking an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate exams, and what scores the student is earning on those exams.

Admissions committees want to see that students are challenging themselves in their course load, but they also want to see that the students are succeeding in those more challenging courses. This is why it’s not advantageous for a student to just take as many AP or IB courses as his or her school offers, unless he or she is truly certain of earning a high grade in the course. If the student doesn’t know if he or she will earn a passing grade on the AP or IB exam, that’s less of a deciding factor.

Taking the exam and not earning a passing score is not a deal-breaker for most colleges. A passing score is considered icing on the cake, and not-passing score is not a detractor. University admissions departments don’t want to discourage students from attempting the AP Microeconomics test just because they’re not sure if they’ll earn a score of a 2 or 3. Students are rewarded for taking the challenging courseload, as well as the exam, and if they earn a high score, it’s great, but if they don’t, they shouldn’t stress about it, at least as far as getting into college concerned.

Paul Thomson is a writer and frequent online contributor who is passionate about improving college readiness. He frequently writes about the http://www.shmoop.com/ap-english-language/ >AP English language and http://www.shmoop.com/ap-microeconomics/>AP Microeconomics . In his spare time, he loves to promote the joy of reading to youth in his community.

English as a second language lesson about idioms and sayings. American English ESL EFL taught online by Teacher Phil English. TOEIC exam preparation and fluent accent reduction practice online every day. Free ESL English as a second language EFL English as a foreign language instruction and communication fluency lessons with language training from ESL English Online free videos and Lessons with expert teacher school classroom online. Free language tutor teacher is available 24/7 for free ESL communications TOEIC exam practice and EFL tutor language lesson. Idioms and phrases, grammar, nouns, words and verbs, adjectives, adverbs, sentences and full lessons online ESL language. Foreign native speaker free teacher Internet video perfect exam score and global job prospect. TESOL TEFL CELTA certification language instruction and lessons for the world to learn ESL English as a foreign language. TeacherPhilEnglish is here to teach American and Canadian Accent Reduction English! This free Idiom lesson is good for studying fluent English! ESL ELF foreign native speaker teacher online free lesson study! This is learn English article #1. Teacher Phil is right here to teach you in high quality!

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THE HINDU EDITORIAL DISCUSSION - ENGLISH ANTI IMMIGRATION POLICY & HUMAN ERA - 22th Feb

The Hindu Editorial Analysis of today (IMPORTANT FOR SBI PO & SYNDICATE BANK) aims at a review of all the Editorial Articles published today along with in depth analysis of ENGLISH ANTI IMMIGRATION POLICY & HUMAN ERA You’ll get a vocabulary booster and a Comprehension practice too. It is important part of SBI PO, SSC CGL, SBI PO VACANCY, LIC, CLERK, SBI PO 2017, RAILWAYS, SBI BANK etc

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How to find articles for

This is a tutorial developed for EN383 (Nature and Structure of English). It provides some instruction on how to use databases for finding articles for research papers that are due for this course
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http://www.engvid.com Let’s talk business! Today you’ll learn vocabulary that will help you to read and speak about the economy. We will look at common words used to discuss economic matters, such as GDP, stagnation, fiscal, and more. These words and expressions will help you read financial news articles and follow economic reports on television and online. After the lesson, take the quiz and try to practice these words by discussing economic matters in English with your co-workers and friends. Feel free to ask me questions in the comments section on engVid. http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-how-to-talk-about-the-economy/

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I’m Adam. Today’s lesson, we’re going to look at business English. We’re going to talk about the economy. Now, we’re not going to get into too much detail. We’re not going to get into economic theories, etc. What we’re going to look at is some vocabulary that will help you read financial articles and newspapers, or online, or watch financial broadcasts on TV; CNN, Money Matters, etc., things like that. So, we’re going to look at all these words.

We’re going to start with “GDP” because everything somehow relates to “GDP – gross domestic product”. What is this? This is the total value, the total monetary value of goods and services produced within a country. So everything that the country produces from toilet paper to airplanes, and services from massage to heart surgery, all the money that’s made from these goods and services together adds up to the GDP. So, when we’re talking about GDP, we’re going to refer back to this expression when we’re talking about some of these other words.

So, first, let’s look at “fiscal”. “Fiscal” basically means anything to do with money, anything to do with financial matters, especially when we’re talking about taxes. Okay? So, when… The most common thing you’ll hear is “fiscal year”. So when we’re talking about a company’s fiscal year, we’re talking about it’s the beginning of its tax year to the end of its tax year. In some countries, everybody matches this to January to December; in other countries, you’re allowed… Your fiscal year starts when you start your business, and then one year later is the end of your fiscal year. It’s easier to match it to the calendar year, but…

A “quarter”. Now, you’re going to always hear about prices, and stocks, and values going up or down over the last quarter or over the last two quarters. What is a “quarter”? It’s basically three months. So if you’re talking about the first quarter of the year, you’re talking about January, February, March. That’s your first quarter. Your next three months, second quarter. Four quarters makes one year.

“Currency”. I think everybody knows this word, but just in case, this is the money that is used in a country or a region. This is the monetary value that is used for exchanges, trades, investments, etc. In Canada, we use the Canadian dollar. In the U.S., they use the American dollar. Euro in Europe, etc.

A “budget”. A “budget” or “to budget”, it can be a noun or a verb, means to make a plan on how to spend a certain amount of money. So, for example, a government has this much money that they need to spend, or they have a plan that they want to spend this much money. Now, they want to spend a million dollars. I’m being very simple, here; I’m not going to get into big numbers. They need to spend a million dollars to provide all the services that they need and to buy all the materials that they need to import, etc. If they are running on a deficit, that means that they need to spend more money than they have. They have to spend on things to bring in or to run the country, but they don’t have. So if I need to spend a million dollars but I only make the revenues of the country are only 0,000, then they will run on 0,000 deficit. Okay?

“Surplus” is the opposite. “Surplus” is when the government or any company, you don’t have to apply this to a government, when you have more money than you need for the budget. So if I need to spend a million dollars over the next year, but I have a million and a half, then I have half a million dollar surplus, which is always a good thing.

“Inflation/deflation”. “Inflation” is when prices of goods and services go up, but wages stay the same. So, basically, the purchase power of the individual goes down. You have the same amount of money, but you can buy fewer things or you can hire fewer people to do to have services for you. “Deflation” is the opposite. That’s when prices go down, and the value of your dollar or your currency goes up. Both situations are not good.
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Learning English in Japan differs from learning Spanish, French, or German in America. Many Americans take foreign language classes at school, learning vocabulary and grammar, practicing all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. American language education faces problems. Many Americans speak English, and only English. Many Americans do not have sufficient time in the foreign language classroom to learn a new language. Japanese spend more than enough time in the classroom to learn a foreign language. Japanese face a different problem: Foreign language education lacks balance.

In Japan, students learn grammar and vocabulary much as Americans generations ago learned Latin. While this situation is slowly changing in Japan, students who want to learn to communicate in English generally have to go outside the normal school system to study languages in private language schools. Many Americans and other native English speakers teach in such schools. The students come to use English, to practice what they know. Many teachers in these schools have materials provided for them, but many teachers also need to create their own materials. In this article, we would like to present a topic that we have found of interest to students in Japan: alternative American lifestyles.

Read alternative American lifestyles and you may immediately think of the ways that people can live based on religion, sexual identity, or other factors. We are only talking about people who live on boats or in RVs. Many Americans live on boats or in RVs across America and around the world. In Japan, people do not appear to live on boats or in RVs. Most Japanese are very interested in different lifestyles. Below is the information that we have used in our classes:

Boat Life

Although most people in the United States live in houses and apartments, a significant number of people live on boats. In some ways, life is different from living on land. Land dwellers do not need to think about checking that the boat is securely tied to the dock or having the barnacles scraped every six months.

We call people who live on boats liveaboards. Liveaboards do what most other people do, going to work, attending school, and listening to music. Their lifestyle is unique in that water surrounds their homes. Liveaboards can enjoy living on water near an urban environment, seeing birds on the dock, and watching them fly overhead. Sitting on the deck and watching the moon at night is a lovely boat experience. Listening to the water lap gently against the side of the boat can make each day feel just like a holiday.

When a storm comes though, the same water may seem like a roaring ocean about to attack.

Being a liveaboard can present other problems. Boats can have leaks, grow mold, or become damp. Forget about crispy pretzels. On a boat, you’re more likely to have slightly dampish pretzels if you don’t eat them right from the store. The dampness from the water permeates the boat, making staying warm in the winter a challenge.

Liveaboards also have the great advantage of flexibility. If you want to go someplace, you just take your boat. Going inland can be difficult though.

RV Life

Drive around Japan and you will probably see small RVs, which are recreational vehicles. They are little cabins on wheels for camping with space for sleeping, showering, and cooking. RVs in America are usually much bigger; some have toads. A toad is slang for a car that you tow behind your RV. Drive somewhere in a 40-foot RV, which is a fairly standard size, and you will probably not want to drive the RV if you have to go grocery shopping or run errands. The toad is the answer and many people with RVs have toads. We think the word “toad” comes from “towed.” RVs come in many sizes, some under 20 feet and some about 40 feet.

Not that long ago, most RV owners were senior citizens. Now, in the 21st century, however, Americans from babies to senior citizens live and travel in RVs. Some RVS are simply for vacations, but many people actually live in their RVS, traveling around the United States and Canada. If you live in an RV, America is your home. There is always something new to see or do.

If you ever travel to Japan and teach English there, you may want to think about teaching alternative lifestyles like these.

If you are an experienced editor specializing in medicine or the hard sciences, Aaron Language Services is interested in working with you. You can find us at on the web at http://www.aaronlanguage.com/personnel.html. We are a translation and editing business primarily serving a Japanese client base. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

In this English lesson, you will learn how to use the indefinite article (a, an)

Dans ce cours, vous allez apprendre l’article indéfini en anglais.

“a”, “an” and “the” are articles. They are types of determiners and they modify nouns.

“a” and “an” are indefinite articles. This means “not specific” so they refer to non-specific instances of a noun.

The most common use is when it is the first time we refer to an instance of a noun.

In this video lesson, I explain the grammar rules and all of the other situations of when to use indefinite articles.

There are some grammar exercises at the end of the lesson.

Other videos:

Grammar lessons: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpS4_AM1c0s0ozpROeE2A9ff
Countable and uncountable nouns: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpSifmU3OsnQuex9lhBxuuOU
Listening exercises: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpRdmnAzmYwdc0Az0ZOG2XNA
Vocabulary videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpTlYAYSitjwWn29BEdCBi9j

Andrew,
Crown Academy of English
Website: http://www.crownacademyenglish.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/Crown_English
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/CrownAcademyEnglish

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