Posts Tagged ‘Improve’

Learn standard punctuation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f_Dk7WatIY&list=PLfQSN9FlyB6Q8MTULKyIHzqKeXpBbxES6
Study English Grammar: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEEA0D5FA42DB4C58

Index:
0:27 Model headlines
0:56 Five forms of language practice
2:47 The grammar used in headlines
6:20 Practice task
6:59 Using “headline” and “headlines”

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ABOUT ME:
Former classroom teacher. Published author. Online instructor. I’ve been online since 2007, posting videos for students, blogging for teachers, and providing different forms of language support. My goal is to make language studies enjoyable and productive. For more info and resources, visit www.englishwithjennifer.com.

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Related post on news headlines:
How to Make Sense of News Headlines

Images used in this lesson were retrieved from the public domain at https://pixabay.com/

Recommended learner’s dictionaries:
https://www.ldoceonline.com/
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/

Recommended translation and vocabulary tool (Chrome extension):
http://readlang.com/

A range of U.S. news websites:
https://www.cnn.com/
http://www.foxnews.com/
https://www.npr.org/
https://www.nytimes.com/
http://theweek.com/
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI
👉 Check the latest Video – American Idioms I love to use the most?

How to improve your English writing skills? – Free English lesson

I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings.

• Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided.

• Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g

There are many problems in her class (incorrect)
Her class is facing many problems. (Correct)
There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect)
The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct)

• Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting.

Students think literature is very hard.
Students think literature is difficult.

• Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete.

He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb)
My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)

http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you’re in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/

Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
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Books I Recommend to Improve your English Grammar| Accurate English

Here are the grammar books that I recommend in order to improve your English. These books are good for advanced speakers of English. I have included the Amazon links.

“Understanding and Using English Grammar”: https://amzn.to/2XU6B1j
Workbook for “Understanding and Using English Grammar”: https://amzn.to/2Wd4bKE
The Ins and Outs of Prepositions: https://amzn.to/2GPGWBh
“The Article Book”: https://amzn.to/2GQ83fp
“Three Little Words”: https://amzn.to/2GPH9o3

buy video courses at: https://www.accurateenglish.com

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visit website: https://www.accurateenglish.com

Become a better writer, no matter what you’re writing! I’ll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you’ll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer.

Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary:

Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/

TRANSCRIPT

Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it’s going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. “Show, not tell. What’s he talking about?”

When we’re writing we want to avoid simple statements that don’t really add any description or flavour. For example: “The man was stressed.” [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We’re kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what’s he doing? “The man was fidgeting. Ah, he’s fidgeting. He’s so stressed, he can’t sort of stay still. And biting his nails.” Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was.

Next one: “The room was messy.” Again, it’s a simple, simple sentence. It’s just one sort of main clause and it’s not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: “There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn”… I’ll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. “…and there were dirty plates and cups”. Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy.

Example three: “The woman was confident.” Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? “She strode”, that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I’ve picked an interesting verb. “She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her.” Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident.

Example four: “The boy was careful.” Tell us how he was careful. “He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet.” Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. “He placed”… There’s no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: “the top drawer of his cabinet”.

Next example: “The stadium was full.” Again, I’m bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. “The sound from the stadium was deafening”, okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: “The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player’s name.” Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay?

A couple of ones to describe weather. “It was hot.” Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you’re sort of a teenager or an adult, it’s time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: “The sun was causing damage to”, “The sun was melting”, “The sun was burning”, “The sun was causing the lady’s skin to turn red”. Okay? Pick out details that show the effect.

“It was cold. It was cold.” How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? “Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as”… I don’t know. “It was three inches thick.” Whatever, you’ve got to show details rather than just stating things. -“It was windy.” -“The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella”-you know for keeping the rain off us-“was totally”-that means fully-“bent”-Yeah? Bent-“…out of shape”, out of its normal position.

“He found it funny.” Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to… For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: “He was rolling around the floor in hysterics.” Okay? When you’re so… Find something so funny, you’re like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can’t control his body he finds it so funny. “Hysterics”, that means like totally lost control. “Hysteria”. Okay? Hysterics. “In hysterics” means finding something really, really funny.

“The castle was captured.” Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what’s happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What’s happening? “The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd.” Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It’s good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead?

Thank you for watching today’s video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I’ll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.