Posts Tagged ‘Lessons’

► http://llttutorials.com In this English Grammar Tutorial, we’ll learn about Articles ‘A’ and ‘An’ and we’ll understand whether its A university or An university

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you were probably taught at school ‘an’ should be followed by a vowel (a,e,i,o,u) and a should be followed by a consonant:

an elephant
a car

Unfortunately, this is not always true!

When to use an or a depends on how the word is pronounced and not on how it is written.

The U in university is pronounced with a long ‘u’ sound which sounds like ‘yew’ and is written as j in the phonetic alphabet. So, although the letter is a vowel, it is not pronounced like one in ‘university’ because it does not have a vowel sound. We therefore say ‘a university’.

The U in umbrella is pronounced as a vowel sound ( Λ using the phonetic alphabet) and so we use ‘an’. We therefore say ‘an umbrella’.

This rule also applies to the use of consonants.

The word hour has a soft ‘h’ which is weakly pronounced and therefore we say ‘an hour’.

If the word has a hard ‘h’, like house, we use ‘a’ (a house).

Take a look at the following words and decide if they should have ‘a’ or ‘an’.

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Watch more Grammar Lessons videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/515799-How-to-Use-Quotation-Marks-Grammar-Lessons

I like to think of the quotation mark as the punctuation that can save your job, or save your grade in the class. And that’s because we use of quotation mark to attribute ideas and words to the original speaker, so you use quotation mark to show someone else has said something, either verbally, or they’ve written it on the page and if you don’t use the quotation mark, when you are duplicating someone’s work; it’s what we called plagiarism, we definitely want to avoid that.
Grammatically speaking, punctuating the quotation mark can be a little tricky, so I’ll show you a few examples, quotation marks often take two forms, we’ll either lead with the quotation and give the attribution at the end of the sentence, or we’ll lead with the attribution and, and with the quotation. So here is an example how to punctuate a sentence when we lead with a quotation: We have “It’s a lovely day” Jim said. Well, in this case notice that we start with the quotation mark, we capitalized the first word and we keep the comma inside of the quotation mark, another words we, we tuck the punctuation inside of those quotes and then we give the attribution “Jim said” and the period doesn’t come until the very end of the sentence.

Now, in this sentence we flip the order and we’re starting with the attribution, so we say Jim said, we capitalize “J” cause it’s the beginning of the sentence and this time we put the comma after said and then we [inaudible 00:43:40] into the quota. So, Jim said, comma, quotation mark, capital, it’s a lovely day, period quotation mark. Can be a little tricky, because sometimes the comma goes inside of the quotation, sometimes it goes outside; it depends on how you’re setting your sentence out.

So, let’s say that it’s such a nice day out that Jim tells his coworkers he is sick and he gets out of the office for the day. Well, I might say something like, Jim said he was feeling sick, but we are skeptical. So, you can see this is taken on a different form, because we’re only quoting a small part of something that Jim said, not a complete sentence and we’re tucking it into our sentence; so that even without the quotation marks it would read well, it would read as a complete sentence. Jim said he was feeling sick, but we are skeptical. So, in this case you can put a quotations around his partial quote and you don’t have to capitalize the first of his quote. So, I hope that this makes; using quotation marks a little bit clearer for you.
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This lesson, which deals with the colon and the semi colon, is part of a series of lessons I am making on how we use punctuation marks. Please go to my website for more information. https://www.skype-lessons.com/online-…

USE COLONS (1 clause must be independent)

1) To explain, conclude, or follow from the main clause

There’s one thing I really loathe: impatience.
We had two options: pay the money or suffer the consequences.
There are two ways we could do this: the easy way or the hard way.

2) In direct speech

The teacher would say the following: ‘Do your homework!’

3) In lists

Pancakes are made from simple ingredients: eggs, flour, and milk.

USE SEMICOLONS (2 clauses must be independent)

1) Offers additional or contrasting information. Demonstrates a relation between the two independent clauses. (It replaces the coordinating conjunctions: and, but, for, so, yet, nor, or)

I ordered lamb; she had a salad.
I’d love to visit Italy; I’ve always loved Italian food.

2) Use with the following conjunctive adverbs: otherwise, however, moreover, therefore, nevertheless, consequently, accordingly, consequently, instead.

We didn’t go to the museum; instead, we went home.
3 students came to the class; however, only 1 was prepared.

Exercises here. Thanks to Bristol University

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_45.htm#commaexercise

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_46.htm

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_43.htm

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_44.htm
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Writing Lessons : How to Write a Proper Press Release

When writing a press release or media release, be sure to include the pertinent information, such as who, what, when, where and why. Write a proper press release with tips from an author in this free video on writing techniques.

Expert:
John Graden
Contact: www.Johngraden.com
Bio: John Graden is an internationally acclaimed speaker, author and pioneering entrepreneur.
Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
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Teach article writing by having students select a topic, looking at magazine examples, get peer feedback on the topic and write several drafts. Teach students to write articles by having them share their information with a class of peers using advice from a writing instructor in this free video writing lesson.

Expert: Laura Minnegerode
Bio: Laura Minnigerode is a writing instructor and former classroom teacher.
Filmmaker: Todd Green

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