Posts Tagged ‘Nine’

Hasan A. Yahya, PhDs. A writer from Michigan, USA.

It’s no surprise that fast food plays a large part in the diet of most Americans. We’ve seen the effects that dietary degradation can have upon our health. More  and more children, from 3 to 9 are suffering from obesity. A good portion of pre-school children are overweight. Children that are overweight are at an increased risk for health problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes and other conditions. Parents often complain that their children are picky eaters. And they  should re-evaluate the eating habits of the whole family. It is time for mothers to try new ways to produce and present food to their children. Here are some ways to change your child habits of eating:

Keep in mind that more calories don’t necessarily mean more nutrition. Ask your child for his or her opinion.
Write a list of your child’s favorite foods then look through recipes for different ways to prepare those foods while integrating new foods into your meals.
It is normal to receive your child rejection to some foods, your child will not like every food you serve. That’s okay. Like yourself, probably certain foods that you don’t like. So, your child doesn’t have to like every food in order to eat healthy.
Let them share food preparing: Get the kids  involved. Let them help you prepare a meal.  Prepare a food that you normally don’t include in your regular meals. Try a new recipe.
You are the role model for your children: Set a good example for your children through your own healthy eating habits. Break up the mealtime routine.
The factor of child personality:  Your child personality  plays a great role when it comes to how he or she will respond to new foods. It’s important to understand your child’s personality as you are offering up a world of food to her/him.  Children usually respond by behaving in the way that gets them attention. If they are labeled as picky, as they will act that way and thus exacerbate the problem. Specialists suggest that you try not to react dramatically  if your child turns his nose up to a food and resist the urge to label him as ‘the hater of all that is green.’  He will pick up on your reaction and repeat his behavior again and again.
There are ways to help children expand their dietary delights. Keep trying new dishes. Add a variety of foods. Don’t get stuck in the rut of preparing the same meals repeatedly. If children say they don’t like a particular food encourage them to taste it but don’t try to force them to eat it. Try the same food again at a later time or use the same food in a different way.
Repetition of providing food several times:  Research shows that it takes 8 to 15 times of introducing a new food to a child for him to accept it. This means  that you need to offer that food an average of 10 times before your child will consider eating it. 
 Studies have shown that food preferences are shaped between the ages of three and five.  In many cases, be patient, and repeat doing the same thing one more time. Sure! you will succeed. (571 words) wwwaskdryahya.com

Sources: http://livingstonparentjournal.com/

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/125373/how_to_change_your_childs_eating_habits_pg2.html?cat=25

Professor, Dr. Hasan A. Yahya is an Arab American writer, scholar, and professor of Sociology lives in the United States of America,  originally from Palestine. He graduated from Michigan State University with  2 Ph.d degrees. He published 65 books plus , and 500 plus articles on sociology, religion, psychology, politics, poetry, and short stories. Philosophically, his writings concern logic, justice and human rights worldwide. Dr. Yahya is the author of Crescentologism: The Moon Theory,  and  Islam Finds its Way, on Amazon. He’s an expert on Race Relations, Arab and Islamic cultures, he is also, interested in religion, world affairs and  global strategic planning for justice and human rights. www.dryahyatv.com

P oll any group of employees—
from the
mailroom to the upper
levels of management – and
you’ll find poor workplace
communication as one of the
top organizational complaints.
For something that
we do every day, we just
don’t seem to be very good
at it. In fact, the attitude
that communication should
come naturally may be contributing
to the problem,
since workplace communication
remains one of the most
overlooked and untrained job
skills.
Although most employees
have little control over their
companies’ communication
processes, all of us contribute
to the quality of our
workplace communication
through our interactions with
our coworkers. Here are a
few tips to improve communication
in your own corner
of the workplace.
Communication Tips
For a Happier
Workplace
Just the facts, ma’am.
Many a meeting has been derailed by the one
or two participants who seem unable to limit
their input to the subject at hand. Before
speaking, envision topical bullet points and
limit your comments to them. If you find
yourself veering off course or notice others
looking at their watches as you speak, wrap it
up by briefly summarizing your main points.
Never assume that an electronic message has
been received. Digital information can be lost
in transmission or accidentally deleted by the
person receiving it. Make a habit of regularly
following up on important communications.
Give frequent updates.
It’s easy to lose perspective when working on
large-scale projects that aren’t due for completion
until months later. Schedule daily,
weekly, or monthly summaries of work in progress
in order to keep superiors, co-workers,
and subordinates up to date and aware of
changes that may affect them.
No one likes to be told no. When asked to perform
a task that may take you away from other
important work, inform the requestor of the
time or expense the task will take to accomplish,
and the effect it will have on your previously
scheduled projects. Armed with this information,
the requestor will be able to draw
his or her own conclusions about whether to
proceed, and is less likely to focus on your
perceived “unwillingness” to do the work.
Never say “no” as a first response
Limit your message list.
Nothing is more frustrating than being copied
on an e-mail chain about a topic that doesn’t
concern you. Abuse of the “copy all” function
reduces productivity, creates confusion, and
eventually causes employees to disregard important
communications because they no
longer have the time to filter relevant information
from the avalanche of information overflowing
from their in-boxes. Before hitting the
send button, mentally verify that each person
on the copy list needs access to the information
contained within.
Always follow up.
Know your audience.
© 2008 EAPtools.com E041

Clinical Social Worker with extensive workplace employee counseling and intervention experience. Former professional counselor serving many large federal and private industry employee assistance programs. Publisher of the newsletter used by the U.S. Congress for it’s employees, WorkLife Excel.