Posts Tagged ‘‘racist’’

Is America racist? Is it — as President Barack Obama said — “part of our DNA”? Author and talk-show host Larry Elder examines America’s legacy of racism, whether it’s one we can ever escape, and in the process offers a different way of looking at things like Ferguson, crime, police and racial profiling. Donate today to PragerU: http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h

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The African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968) refers to the social movements in the United States aimed at outlawing racial discrimination against black Americans and restoring voting rights to them. This article covers the phase of the movement between 1955 and 1968, particularly in the South. The emergence of the Black Power Movement, which lasted roughly from 1966 to 1975, enlarged the aims of the Civil Rights Movement to include racial dignity, economic and political self-sufficiency, and freedom from oppression by white Americans.

The movement was characterized by major campaigns of civil resistance. Between 1955 and 1968, acts of nonviolent protest and civil disobedience produced crisis situations between activists and government authorities. Federal, state, and local governments, businesses, and communities often had to respond immediately to these situations that highlighted the inequities faced by African Americans. Forms of protest and/or civil disobedience included boycotts such as the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955–1956) in Alabama; “sit-ins” such as the influential Greensboro sit-ins (1960) in North Carolina; marches, such as the Selma to Montgomery marches (1965) in Alabama; and a wide range of other nonviolent activities.

Noted legislative achievements during this phase of the Civil Rights Movement were passage of Civil Rights Act of 1964, that banned discrimination based on “race, color, religion, or national origin” in employment practices and public accommodations; the Voting Rights Act of 1965, that restored and protected voting rights; the Immigration and Nationality Services Act of 1965, that dramatically opened entry to the U.S. to immigrants other than traditional European groups; and the Fair Housing Act of 1968, that banned discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. African Americans re-entered politics in the South, and across the country young people were inspired to action.

Desegregation busing in the United States (also known as forced busing or simply busing) is the practice of assigning and transporting students to schools in such a manner as to redress prior racial segregation of schools, or to overcome the effects of residential segregation on local school demographics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desegregation_busing_in_the_United_States
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Harvard psychologist, Dr. Mahzarin R. Banaji, delivers a lecture titled “Paradoxes of Mind & Society” at the Yale University Department of Psychology. Dr. Banaji describes her research into the unconscious prejudices that human beings may carry below the threshold of consciousness. She is also a key contributor for the development of the “Implicit Association Test” (IAT), which is used in a range of experiments to measure the magnitude of prejudices that may lie in the subconscious of the test taker. This video may be viewed in its entirety along with a description and transcript at the following link.

Democratic Vistas
http://www.yale.edu/terc/democracy/media/jan23.htm

Lecture Date: January 23, 2001

Additional Research Information:
(Updated 05/15/2009):

Harvard Science: Prejudices we won’t admit
http://tinyurl.com/qubejc

WashingtonPost.com: See No Bias
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A27067-2005Jan21?language=printer

Scientific American: The Implicit Prejudice
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=the-implicit-prejudice&print=true

Project Implicit®
http://www.projectimplicit.net/

Copies of Technical Research Papers can be obtained at:
http://projectimplicit.net/articles.php

The Test
https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/

University of Washington: The Unconscious Roots of Racism
http://uwnews.org/article.asp?articleid=2568

University of Washington: Prejudice affects 90 to 95 percent of people
http://uwnews.washington.edu/article.asp?articleID=2607

University of Michigan Health System: Your Child & Television
http://www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/TV.htm#attitude

The Media Awareness Network: Kids & Racial Stereotypes
http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/resources/tip_sheets/racial_tip.cfm

Gladwell.com: The Second Mind (Blink)
http://www.gladwell.com/blink/blink_excerpt1.html
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Bolt faces court over 'racist' articles

Nine high profile Aboriginals have taken Melbourne newspaper columnist Andrew Bolt to court alleging he contravened the Racial Discrimination Act in several articles he wrote.