Posts Tagged ‘Scholarly’

This video is about the anatomy of a scholarly article. Once you know the typical framework for these articles, you can quickly scan and decide whether an article will support your research assignment. QVCC thanks the NSCU Libraries at North Carolina State University for sharing the original “Anatomy of a Scholarly Article” under a Creative Commons License.
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Recording from February 2019 workshop. Curious about what it takes to turn that paper or thesis into a journal article? This hour-long online workshop takes a look at how publishing works, including choosing the right journal, the peer review process, and what to expect if and when your manuscript is accepted for publication.
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Characteristics to look for when distinguishing between a scholarly (peer-reviewed) and popular article

Magazines and Scholarly Journals (University of Arkansas Libraries)

What is a popular magazine? What is a scholarly journal publication? This video describes some of the basic differences between the two.

Someday soon, you’ll need to find a scholarly journal article for a project or research paper. Awesome. No problem. But, wait a second, what is a “scholarly journal article?”

How is it different from a popular source like a newspaper or magazine article?

Good question! Let’s break down the differences.

Scholarly journals enable scholars — experts in a particular academic field — to communicate their research with other experts by publishing articles and to stay current by reading about other scholars’ work. Consequently, scholarly journals create a community of experts who are all participating in a kind of “conversation” in that academic field.

Rather than a face-to-face conversation, this is a formal conversation, which takes place over months and years through these scholarly articles. The most important part of this long term written conversation – what makes it a “scholarly” conversation – is what’s called the “peer review process.” The peer review process works like this: in order for a scholar to get published in a scholarly journal, his or her expert peers must first read their work and critique it.

These “peer reviewers” make sure the scholar has made valid arguments, and that he or she has cited appropriate experts in the field to support the argument. This is why you may hear scholarly articles referred to as peer-reviewed articles. These terms are often used interchangeably.

This rigorous evaluation process ensures scholarly work meets a higher standard than popular publications and allows other scholars to rely on these articles for their own research.

So, why is this important for you? First, the information in a scholarly text has been carefully evaluated, so it is more reliable and credible than information in popular sources.

Second, reading scholarly journal articles for your projects can give you insight into professional argumentation and research practices.

Finally, every scholarly text has extensive bibliographies that introduce you to important texts in the field, which can help you extend your research in that area. When you read the articles and books the scholar cited in his or her article, you are taking part in the scholarly conversation — and getting leads additional sources!

Okay, so where are these scholarly articles hiding? Let’s say you’re in a research database and you only want scholarly articles. How do you do it? In EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete, you check the box for “Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals” before clicking the search button. This limits the search results to material found in peer-reviewed publications.

Note that some material in these publications, such as book reviews and editorials, may not be peer-reviewed. To make sure, click the article title and check that the document type is an “article” or “journal article.” Other research databases have similar interfaces.

For more information, please, Ask Us.
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Transcript:
So you’ve found a source that you want to use for your assignment but you’ve also been told that you should only use scholarly journal articles.

So how do you know if the source you’ve found is actually a scholarly journal article?

To find out, answer the following two questions:

Is the source from a peer-reviewed journal? And is it an article?

First, make sure that the journal in which your article is published is peer reviewed.

Some search tools offer a one-click option to narrow your search results to those articles classified as peer reviewed. However, these options are not always accurate.

A more reliable approach involves checking the website for the journal itself.

Journals will often identify themselves as peer-reviewed on their site, though sometimes they’ll use the word “refereed,” which is just another word for peer reviewed.

Start by navigating to the section of the website that describes the journal’s mission. This section is often labelled using phrases like “About us,” “Aims and Scope,” or “Mission statement.” Journals will often use these sections to highlight their status as peer reviewed because it brings with it a certain prestige.

For example, the journal Ethnic and Racial Studies describes itself as a publication in which all articles “are peer reviewed to a high standard.”

The journal may also mention its peer review process in the section of its website that outlines the process for submitting articles for publication. This section is sometimes called “submission guidelines” or “instructions for authors.”

Second, make sure that your source is actually an article.

In addition to publishing full-length research articles, journals sometimes publish other types of content like book reviews, editorials, and commentary.

You may find evidence that what you’re looking at is an article in the source itself. For example, some articles identify themselves as articles in their introductory paragraphs.

Similarly, book reviews and editorials often begin with headings that indicate what type of source they are.

If you’re still unsure, check the headings in the table of contents for the issue of the journal in which your source is published.

Let’s say you’re looking at the source called “From heroes to vulnerable victims” which is published in volume 36, issue 7 of the journal Ethnic and Racial Studies.

To view the table of contents, navigate to the website for the journal, then to the page for the specific issue that contains your source.

The table of contents for this issue has the headings “Original Articles” and “Book Reviews.” Our source is found under the heading “Original Articles,” which confirms that the source is indeed an article.

In sum, if your source is from a peer-reviewed journal and if it’s actually an article, chances are your source is a scholarly journal article.

Keep in mind, however, that there’s a lot of variation in the ways in which journal content is published, so the methods described in this video may not work in all instances.

If you’re still unsure about any of the sources you’ve found — or you have any questions at all — just ask us.
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