Posts Tagged ‘Scientific’

Some scientific journals are asking authors to prepare a graphical abstract to be submitted along with the manuscript. Graphical abstracts can help attract readers to your papers and, in my opinion, worth the time and effort to craft them. In this video tutorial, I talk about the benefits of graphical abstracts to the author and briefly show how to prepare one.

If you liked this video, you might also be interested in these:

How to Write an Abstract for a Scientific Article: https://youtu.be/qYkXA6gDRlg

How to Write a Compelling Introduction to Your Scientific Paper: https://youtu.be/WBdg2OLU1UY

If you use video in your research or would like to make a video about your research, check out my other YouTube channel, The Scientist Videographer: https://www.youtube.com/user/sciencevideography

Follow me on Twitter: @scivideographer
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ACS AuthorUniversity, Episode 4
How to Write a Scientific Article: Find the Story

Research is tough. Writing your research into a paper can be even tougher. In this series of videos for ACS AuthorUniversity, ACS Editors dispense their advice on everything from finding your research story to how to get started writing to how to structure and organize your research article.

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Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/AmericanChemicalSociety/
Twitter! https://twitter.com/AmerChemSociety
For more information, please visit: https://pubs.acs.org/page/4authors/index.html

You might also like:
Communicating your Research to the Public: Special Considerations (Because it’s Science!): https://bit.ly/2Nw0USJ
Episode 5: How to Write a Scientific Article: When Should you Start Writing your Research Article? https://bit.ly/2NuRo2c

Produced by the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences.
Join the American Chemical Society! https://bit.ly/Join_ACS

In this video, I talk about how to craft a compelling first sentence for your scientific research paper that will get the reader’s attention and set the stage for the rest of the paper. I show how to use narrative writing to craft opening sentences that are vivid and memorable. The purpose of using narrative elements in otherwise expository writing is to improve comprehension and recall of the material. By creating an indelible image, articulating a conflict or controversy, or making a startling or counterintuitive statement, you can pique the reader’s curiosity.

If you liked this video, you may also enjoy these videos:

How to Write an Abstract for a Scientific Article: https://youtu.be/qYkXA6gDRlg
How to Write a Compelling Introduction to a Scientific Paper: https://youtu.be/WBdg2OLU1UY

If you use video in your research or would like to make a video about your research, check out my other YouTube channel, The Scientist Videographer: https://www.youtube.com/user/sciencevideography

Follow me on Twitter: @scivideographer
Video Rating: / 5

This video focuses on how to write an effective title for a research paper and specifically takes a look at the use of “catchy” titles. What words, phrases, and punctuation marks should you avoid in a scientific title? What is the right length for the title of a scientific paper? Should you pose a question or state a clear finding in a paper title? How can I make my scientific paper title more discoverable by search engines? You’ll find the answers to these questions and more in this video.

Share this video: https://youtu.be/thBaDQ-UCTI

Be sure to watch the video “Message in a Bottle: How to Write a Scientific Paper That’s Memorable”, which contains instructions about how to condense your study’s findings into a single sentence that can be used as a title: https://youtu.be/Kq6eubV4qGg

For more information about titling scientific papers, see the reference list below.

References:
1. Goodman, NW. 2005. From Shakespeare to Star Trek and beyond: a Medline search for literary and other allusions in biomedical titles. BMJ 331(7531), 1540-1542. doi: 10.1136/bmj.331.7531.1540
2. Hartley J. 2005. To attract or to inform: what are titles for? JTWC 35, 203–123. (doi:10.2190/NV6E-FN3N-7NGN-TWQT)
3. Hartley J. 2007. Planning that title: practices and preferences for titles with colons in academic articles. Libr. Inf. Sci. Res. 29, 553–568. (doi:10.1016/j.lisr.2007.05.002)
4. Jamali HR, Nikzad M. 2011. Article title type and its relation with the number of downloads and citations. Scientometrics 88, 653–661. (doi:10.1007/s11192-011-0412-z)
5. Letchford A, Moat HS, Preis T. 2015. The advantage of short paper titles. Royal Society Open Science 2, 150266. (doi:10.1098/rsos.150266)
6. Lewison G, Hartley J. 2005. What’s in a title? Numbers of words and the presence of colons. Scientometrics 63, 341–356. (doi:10.1007/s11192-005-0216-0)
7. Michaels S. 2014. Scientists sneak Bob Dylan lyrics into articles as part of long-running bet. The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/sep/29/swedish-cientists-bet-bob-dylan-lyrics-research-papers
8. Soler V. 2007. Writing titles in science: an exploratory study. English for Specific Purposes 26, 90–102. (doi:10.1016/j.esp.2006.08.001)

If you use video in your research or would like to make a video about your research, check out my other YouTube channel, The Scientist Videographer: https://www.youtube.com/user/sciencevideography

Follow me on Twitter: @scivideographer

8 SCIENTIFIC TRICKS TO BECOME PERFECTLY HAPPY

There are thousands of tips and psychological techniques to help you feel happy. But what if our own body had a say in the matter? Here are some findings from neuroscientists — the people who know exactly when and why your brain can give you the feeling of total satisfaction!

Other videos you might like:
10 Facts About Brain Prove You’re Capable of Anything https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhnFLjzL6yQ&
12 Smart Psychological Tips You’d Better Learn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Szahr27ReQo&
11 Military Hacks That’ll Make Your Life Easier https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frG12W0MRf8&

TIMESTAMPS:

Engage in pleasant expectations 0:42

Solve problems one at a time 1:17

Don’t keep things pent up: talk about what bothers you 1:50

Touch and embrace 2:29

Learn, learn, and, once again, learn! 3:12

Play sports 3:44

Always try to get a good sleep 4:40

Learn to say “Thank you” 5:16

SUMMARY:
– The process of waiting for something nice, such as food or sex, is similar to the learned salivation response. Our brain experiences pleasure by simply anticipating the fun event.
– For every right decision, our brain rewards itself with a dose of neurotransmitters that calm the limbic system and help us once again see the world in a better light.
– Advisable not to keep your problems pent up. Whenever you talk about them, your brain triggers the production of serotonin and even manages to find some positive sides to the situation.
– To us, humans, social interaction is important. Various forms of physical support, especially touch and embraces, can speed up a person’s recovery from an illness.
– For the brain, acquiring new knowledge means permanent adaptation to a changing environment. Using this process, our brain develops, rewarding its own attempts to absorb and process new information with dopamine, the hormone of joy.
– Physical activity is stress for the body. As soon as the stress ends, your body gets a reward: a dose of endorphins, released by the pituitary gland.
– While we sleep in the dark, our body secretes the hormone melatonin. This hormone slows down all processes in the body, helping it to recover and increasing the level of serotonin in the hypothalamus.
– When we say a person, or even fate, for something, we focus ourselves on the positive aspects of life. Pleasant memories trigger serotonin production in the anterior cingulate cortex.

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How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper

Publishing papers is how new discoveries are shared across the scientific community.

Here at IRIS, we think that student researchers have just as much cause to be writing up their research as any other researcher.

To demystify the process, we’ve made a couple of videos in collaboration with Institute of Physics Publishing, explaining the paper writing process.

In this video we look at what actually goes into a paper; what to write, what order to write it in, how to write it, and what to do with your finished paper.

Music by Lee Rosevere
Video by Poppy Illsley
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Millions of papers are deposited in this site. Share this site and help other researchers. Knowledge should be free. Publishing houses are earning billions of dollars without contributing the research fund which is very unfair.
Try this link:
https://sci-hub.tw/

https://sci-hub.cc/ (this link does not work)
http://bigthink.com/neurobonkers/a-pirate-bay-for-science
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Download TeachGlobal App from https://teachglobal.com/app for more lectures!
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How to write a scientific paper

Do you want to write and publish an academic or scientific paper? To get a paper published in a peer-reviewed journal is not difficult. This video will provide you with insights into what to include in each section of the paper and talk you through some of the best practices for writing. This video deals mostly with how to write up the results of quantitative research. The principles, however, apply to qualitative research too (with slightly different content in the methods section). You’ve done a study, you’ve collected and analysed the data. Now it’s time to write it up and get it published.

This video was sponsored by BMC – https://www.biomedcentral.com

This channel posts global health and public health teaching videos and videos about how to find the right job in global health. If you haven’t already, please consider subscribing to this channel and becoming part of this community.

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Images communicate better than text — they integrate a lot of concepts and background in a few seconds. A figure is more than just a simple image — it has a lot of meaning behind it and takes time to produce. The figures are what the reader first notices, and if they are not appealing the reader will move on to another paper instead.

This video is from a Scientific Writing workshop given by Dr Eric Lichtfouse at the Postgraduate School at the University of the Free State (http://postgraduate.ufs.ac.za), South Africa, November 2013.
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