Posts Tagged ‘Their’

David Remnick has been a writer for The New Yorker since 1992 and its editor since 1998. In the age of modern media, his job requires not only producing a quality magazine, but also keeping up financially and technologically. One of his favorite experiences is encountering a young writer with something new to say. Here he shares his Brief but Spectacular philosophy on editing — and being edited.

How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look

Why are itchy lice so tough to get rid of and how do they spread like wildfire? They have huge claws that hook on hair perfectly, as they crawl quickly from head to head.

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DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

Head lice can only move by crawling on hair. They glue their eggs to individual strands, nice and close to the scalp, where the heat helps them hatch. They feed on blood several times a day. And even though head lice can spread by laying their eggs in sports helmets and baseball caps, the main way they get around is by simply crawling from one head to another using scythe-shaped claws.

These claws, which are big relative to a louse’s body, work in unison with a small spiky thumb-like part called a spine. With the claw and spine at the end of each of its six legs, a louse grasps a hair strand to hold on, or quickly crawl from hair to hair like a speedy acrobat.

Their drive to stay on a human head is strong because once they’re off and lose access to their blood meals, they starve and die within 15 to 24 hours.

— How do you kill lice?
Researchers found in 2016 that lice in the U.S. have become resistant to over-the-counter insecticide shampoos, which contain natural insecticides called pyrethrins, and their synthetic version, known as pyrethroids.

Other products do still work against lice, though. Prescription treatments that contain the insecticides ivermectin and spinosad are effective, said entomologist John Clark, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. They’re prescribed to kill both lice and their eggs. Clark said treatments such as suffocants, which block the lice’s breathing holes, and hot-air devices that dry them up, also work. He added that tea tree oil works both as a repellent and a “pretty good” insecticide. Combing lice and eggs out with a special metal comb is also a recommended treatment.

— How long do lice survive?
It takes six to nine days for their eggs to hatch and about as long for the young lice to grow up and start laying their own eggs. Adult lice can live on a person’s head for up to 30 days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

— Can your pet give you lice?
No. Human head lice only live on our heads. They can’t really move to other parts of our body or onto pets.

—+ Read the entire article on KQED Science:
https://www.kqed.org/science/1939435/how-lice-turn-your-hair-into-their-jungle-gym

—+ For more information:
Visit the CDC’s page on head lice: https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/index.html

—+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood:

How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks:

—+ Shoutout!

Congratulations to 🏆HaileyBubs, Tiffany Haner, cjovani78z, יואבי אייל, and Bellybutton King🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the species and subspecies of insect in this episode over at the Deep Look Community Tab:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugwl_PstCaUYdfgvfa54AaABCQ

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KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Do Steve Jobs and Nelson Mandela have anything extraordinary in common? Jamie Mason Cohen shows in this entertaining, thought-provoking and interactive talk that great leaders share some intriguing personality traits… in their handwriting! And what’s more fascinating is that each of us also possesses some of these traits in the way we write too. What if, with some small changes in your writing strokes you could take your inner leader to its fullest potential? “You all have the power to lead, if only you pause for a moment to look inside your writing”, Cohen says. It’s a message with inspiring possibilities for us all.

What others say: “[Jamie’s] abilities are heroic and like a super hero, [he] uses them wisely. [He] has the ability to identify peoples’ leadership qualities, ‘promote’ those qualities and send them away to be confident that they are the ‘best’ reflection of their handwriting.” TEDxUBIWiltz Organizer, Dirk Daenen.

Jamie Mason Cohen is a former film director turned high school teacher who once worked for Saturday Night Live. He is the recipient of the 2013 TED/Huffington Post international teaching award, The Sole Challenge, and a lifelong student of handwriting analysis. Cohen is an innovation expert in education who creates and applies 21st century creative learning strategies to inspire students and teachers around the world in the classroom and the conference room. Handwriting analysis gave Cohen, a shy, twelve year-old boy who was afraid of speaking in front of others the realization that he could express himself with words and that he had dreams to do it one day. From that day on, Cohen developed a passion for learning how a person’s writing could reveal what makes them truly extraordinary.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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