Posts Tagged ‘wikipedia’

Using Google, Wikipedia, Google Scholar, and an academic database for research

This video reviews how you can use Google, Wikipedia, Google Scholar, and the GSU library’s academic database for research.

In the video, I refer to connecting to the GSU campus network using VPN. This link will walk through setting this up:

Virtual Private Network

GOOGLE:
Pros: Good place to start when you are just beginning research on a topic
Cons: Provides you with very broad search results, which can easily overwhelm you with information.

WIKIPEDIA:
Pros: Really good place to get an overview of a topic or a certain issue. You can often use the sources at the bottom of each article to begin you research.
Cons: Wikipedia usually isn’t accepted as a credible source in most classes. You’ll need to use Wikipedia as a place for idea-generation, then search for more scholarly, academic sources.

GOOGLE SCHOLAR:
Pros: It will gather scholarly articles and resources, while being a little less intimidating than the library’s database.
Cons: You have to be connected to the campus network to open and view some of the articles. It doesn’t offer as many options to refine your search as the library’s database does.

LIBRARY ACADEMIC DATABASE:
Pros: It has a HUGE body of information you can pull from, and it has access to thousands of journals and other academic resources.
Cons: It can be a bit scary and overwhelming to navigate.
Video Rating: / 5

This video covers concepts related to searching within academic research databases, using EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete and ProQuest Central as examples. Concepts covered are: using the advanced search, limiters, Boolean operators, citing from a database, and more. Concepts related to information literacy and research skills are covered.

This video is protected by a Creative Commons license and should not be altered in any way. Please give attribution if you would like to share or link to this video.

Top 10 Wikipedia topics that will creep you out. Some scary stuff on this side of the internet!
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Description:
Wikipedia is an endless source of information. Literally, who needs to go to college anymore when all they need to do is get on a computer and search for their topic on Wikipedia? But just as the page can be informative, it can also be extraordinarily creepy to the point where we can all scare ourselves silly. Whether we are looking up legends or truly scary case studies of people who really existed, Wikipedia can be the place where nightmares are made of.
For example, you can research the truly creepy case of black eyed children, who want to invade your space with their creepy all-black eyes and monotone voices. The stories are creepy enough to the point where you will pull the curtains on all of your windows, lock your doors, and ignore any doorbell rings and knocks. The very fact that black eyed children go against the image of innocent children, which are usually harmless.
But Wikipedia pages can also bring on a dose of grim reality, such as the case of Joyce Vincent, who was found dead in her apartment three years after she passed on. It is a product of our worst nightmares; being forgotten. Vincent had cut off contact from many of her friends and loved ones, so when no one heard from her, no one thought twice. Vincent had also prepaid for many of her household services and living off of government benefits for her electricity. When she was found dead, the television was still on. But Vincent’s body was basically nothing but a skeleton and next to a bag of wrapped Christmas presents that never got delivered.
Wikipedia pages can inform us of some of the most fascinating cases of unknown creatures, such as the Flatwoods Monster, the Wendigo, and the Mothman. With startling accounts and pictures to go along with these articles, it certainly makes you wonder if these articles might have an element of truth attached to them. Maybe the intention of these articles isn’t to deter you from going outside, but perhaps staying inside to avoid interacting with these terrifying creatures might very well be worth it.
Then Wikipedia also reminds us how creepy we can be by ourselves by preserving historical evidence of post-mortem photography, where we took creative pictures of the dead in order to preserve memories of that loved one. While the gesture is nice, for those of us today looking back, the practice itself is pretty creepy, especially today where the handling of dead bodies is reserved for the professional caretakers and medical staff.
There is one thing about Wikipedia that needs to be taken into consideration is the fact that anyone can edit a Wikipedia article. Sometimes you have to take the information with a grain of salt, but checking out the sources of these articles is a great place if you want to continue to dig into the creepy subject. There are many more creepy pages out there on the vast online encyclopedia, and this video sheds some light on the ones meant to give you nightmares.

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Featuring:
Joyce Vincent
Flatwoods Monster
Wendigo
June and Jennifer Gibbons
Post-Mortem Photography
Mothman
List of People Who Disappeared Mysteriously
Black Eyed Children
Coffin Birth
Shadow Person

Music Track: Scary Larry

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